Tag: personal data

Amazon lets Alexa recordings evaluate by timeworkers in home-office

5. August 2019

According to a report by German newspaper “Welt am Sonntag”, Amazon has Alexa’s voice recordings listened to not only by its own employees, but also by Polish temporary workers.

For some time now, Amazon has been the subject of criticism because the recordings of the Alexa language assistant are listened to and typed in by employees in order to improve speech recognition. For a long time, however, the users were unaware of this long-standing practice.

It has now become known that temporary workers in the home office listen to and evaluate the recordings using a remote work program. Until recently, a Polish recruitment agency advertised “teleworking all over the country”, although Amazon had previously assured that the voice recordings would only be evaluated in specially protected offices. However, one of the Polish temporary workers stated that many of them would work from home and that among the records were personal data such as names or places that allowed conclusions to be drawn about the person.

Upon request, Amazon confirmed the research results. A spokesman said that some employees were allowed to work from other locations than the Amazon offices, but that particularly strict rules would have to be observed. In particular, working in public places is not allowed.

On the same day, the online job advertisements were deleted and Amazon offered a new data protection option. Users can now explicitly object and block their recording for post-processing by Amazon employees.

Other language assistants have also been or are to be suspended from language evaluation, at least for European users. According to Google, around 0.2 % of the recordings are listened to subsequently, while Apple and Amazon say it is less than 1 %. Google already deactivated the function three months ago and Apple also wants to suspend the evaluation and explicitly ask its users later whether an evaluation may be resumed.

Facebook: private messages from more than 81.000 people for sale

5. November 2018

According to a BBC report, more than 81.000 Facebook profiles were hacked. Private messages and other information was offered for 10 cents per account.

The BBC had the allegations checked by the IT security company Digital Shadows, who confirmed that over 81.000 of the profiles posted online contained private messenger messages. Furthermore, data from more than 176.000 accounts, including e-mail addresses and telephone numbers were available. This information did not necessarily have to come from a hack, as some of it was also open on public Facebook profiles

The BBC Russian Service also emailed the address that offered the data. The respondent – someone called “John Smith”- wrote that the offered data was neither from profiles involved in the Cambridge Analytica scandal nor of the recent security breach revealed in September. He said that his hacker group could offer data from 20 million users, of whom 2.7 million were Russians. But Digital Shadows doubts this because Facebook should have noticed such a big leak.

Facebook reported that its security has not been compromised. The data might be obtained through malicious browser extensions. According to Facebook executive Guy Rosen, they “have contacted browser-makers to ensure that known malicious extensions are no longer available to download in their stores”.

 

Nationwide: multistate data breach investigation settled by paying $ 5.5 million

11. August 2017

According to Hunton & Williams, on the 9th of August, Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company (“Nationwide”), agreed to pay $ 5.5 million to settle a data breach investigation by attorneys general from 32 states concerning a data breach that exposed personal data of about 1.2 million individuals. They also published the settlement.

In October 2012, Nationwide and its wholly-owned subsidiary Allied Property & Cansualty Insurance Company (“Allied”) experienced a data breach that led to an unauthorized access to and exfiltration of certain personal data of their customers, as well as other consumers. Since Nationwide and Allied provide customers with insurance quotes, inter alia the following personal data are collected: full name, Social Security number, date of birth or credit-related score.

The attorneys general alleged that the data breach occurred when hackers exploited a vulnerability in the companies’ web application hosting software. Further, it is alleged that, after the data was exfiltrated, Nationwide and Allied applied a software patch, that was not previously applied, to address the vulnerability.

Besides the $ 5.5 million Nationwide and Allied agreed to implement a series of steps to update its security practices. Besides other measures that are listed in the settlement a technology officer shall be appointed that should manage and monitor security and software updates to ensure that future patches and other security updates are applied.