Tag: Data Protection Bill

The Government of India plans one of the largest Facial Recognition Systems in the World

14. February 2020

The Indian Government released a Request for Proposal to bidder companies to procure a national Automated Facial Recognition System (AFRS). AFRS companies had time to submit their proposals until the end of January 2020. The plans for an AFRS in India are a new political development amidst the intention to pass the first national Data Protection Bill in Parliament.

The new system is supposed to integrate image databases of public authorities centrally as well as incorporate photographs from newspapers, raids, mugshots and sketches. The recordings from surveillance cameras, public or private video feeds shall then be compared to the centralised databases and help identify criminals, missing persons and dead bodies.

Human rights and privacy groups are pointing to various risks that may come with implementing nationwide AFRS in India, including violations of privacy, arbitrariness, mis-identifications, discriminatory profiling, a lack of technical safeguards, and even creating an Orwellian 1984 dystopia through mass surveillance.

However, many people in India are receiving the news about the plans of the Government with acceptance and approval. They hope that the AFRS will lead to better law enforcement and more security in their everyday lives, as India has a comparably high crime rate and only 144 police officers for every 100.000 citizens, compared to 318 per 100.000 citizens in the EU.

UK government introduced Data Protection Bill

13. October 2017

The UK government introduced the Data Protection Bill to implement the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR – 2016/679).

The GDPR enters into force on 25th May 2018 in the European Union. After the brexit, until now it was unclear if the UK would implement the GDPR into UK domestic law. The Data Protection Bill implements not only the legal requirements of the GDPR. The Law Enforcement Directive (2016/680) and the standards of the Council of Europe’s draft modernized Convention 108 on processing of personal data carried out by the intelligence services will also be adopted in the new Data Protection Law of the UK.

The new Law will replace the existing UK Data Protection Act 1998.

Currently the bill is at the beginning of the parliamentary process. The first reading in the House of Lords was held on 13th September, the second on 10th October. The bill consist of seven parts and 18 Schedules.

The data flow between European countries and the UK will not cause those problems that caused concerns after the Brexit, because the data protection level in Europe and the UK will be equal.