Category: Data breach

Massive data breach in Sweden: Millions of Health Hotline Calls exposed online

22. February 2019

Recently around 2.7 million sensitive phone calls were uncovered by Swedish technology news site Computer Sweden. In total, 170,000 hours of conversation were available online on an unencrypted web server. The server had no login mechanism so the recorded calls could be accessed freely.

Sweden operates a national health advice line (1177), which is run by Swedish company Medhelp. For out-of-hour calls they subcontract with a Thailand-based firm called Medicall. According to repords, most of the uncovered calls were made outside the regular times and therefore answered by Medicall. A request from the BBC left Medicall unanswered.

The uncovered data is extremely private as People usually call 1177 seeking medical advice, talking about their symptoms, their kids’ illnesses and giving out their social security number.
The Swedish Data Protection Authority is currently investigating the case.

Apple advises app developer to reveal or remove code for screen recording

12. February 2019

After TechCrunch initiated investigations that revealed that numerous apps were recording screen usage, Apple called on app developers to remove or at least disclose the screen recording code.

TechCrunch’s investigation revealed that many large companies commission Glassbox, a customer experience analytics firm, to be able to view their users’ screens and thus follow and track keyboard entries and understand in which way the user uses the app. It turned out that during the replay of the session some fields that should have been masked were not masked, so that certain sensitive data, like passport numbers and credit card numbers, could be seen. Furthermore, none of the apps examined informed their users that the screen was being recorded while using the app. Therefore, no specific consent was obtained nor was any reference made to screen recording in the apps’ privacy policy.

Based on these findings, Apple immediately asked the app developers to remove or properly disclose the analytics code that enables them to record screen usage. Apples App Store Review Guidelines require that apps request explicit user consent and provide a clear visual indication when recording, logging, or otherwise making a record of user activity. In addition, Apple expressly prohibits the covert recording without the consent of the app users.

According to TechCrunch, Apple has already pointed out to some app developers that they have broken Apple’s rules. One was even explicitly asked to remove the code from the app, pointing to the Apple Store Guidelines. The developer was given less than a day to do so. Otherwise, Apple would remove the app from the App Store.

 

620 million accounts available for sale on dark web

According to the British news website The Register, 620 million accounts from hacked websites are for sale on dark web. For less than $20.000 in Bitcoin, people can buy the stolen accounts on Dream Market, located in the Tor network. Criminals should also be able to buy the copied user data individually. The data comes from hacks from the years 2016 to 2018. Some were already known others now became acquianted.

Among the sixteen hacked websites are the video messaging application Dubsmash (162 million accounts), the diet and exercise app MyFitnessPal (151 million accounts) and the family-tree-tracking service MyHeritage (92million accounts).

As reported by The Register, the account records appear to be legit. The data leak contains e-mail addresses, names and passwords but it does not contain any bank or credit card information and the passwords are encrypted and must therefore be decoded before they can be used.

Depending on the affected side, there are also a few other categories of personal information such as social media authentication tokens. It can be expected that the vendees will use the data for credential stuffing attacks. In such attacks, attackers try out lists with email password pairs at various online services to hack accounts. These attacks are made possible because many users reuse the same password across many websites.

The seller told The Register that they possess one billion accounts in total and that their aim is to make “life easier” for hackers. The seller said “I don’t think I am deeply evil, I need the money. I need the leaks to be disclosed […] I’m just a tool used by the system. We all know measures are taken to prevent cyber attacks, but with these upcoming dumps, I’ll make hacking easier than ever.”

 

Update: 127 million more stolen accounts appeared a few days ago. Affected sites include architecture, interior and designe website Houzz (57 million records), live-video streaming site YouNow (40 million records) and travel booking site Ixigo (18 million records). This data is sold by the hacker for a total of $14,500 in Bitcoin.

Aetna to pay fine for HIV privacy breach

31. January 2019

Healthcare insurer Aetna will have to pay a 935,000$ fine after letters had been sent to nearly 12.000 patients in 2017, disclosing highly sensitive information on the windows of the envelopes.

The information revealed that the recipients were taking HIV-related medications.

In addition, the insurance company will have to complete privacy risk assessments annualy for three years.

The patients have received compensation through a private class action settlement.

 

Dataset with stolen login information appeared

18. January 2019

An 87 gigabyte dataset with stolen login information has appeared on the Internet. This affects 773 million e-mail addresses and over 21 million passwords.

According to initial information, the data do not originate from a single hack, but have been gathered from various hacks. The data set contains information from 12,000 domains and various web services.

The existence of the data set was made public by the Australian IT security expert Troy Hunt on his homepage, who calls it Collection #1. The expert writes that he was first made aware of the record by acquaintances and that the data was originally available from a file hosting provider, where it can no longer be found.

You have the option of checking for yourself whether your data is affected. To check this, simply enter your own address in the search field and click on “pwned?”. The verification service published by the Australian security researcher Troy Hunt is considered trustworthy by the Federal Office for Information Security (BSI). If you are affected, we recommend that you change your password as soon as possible.

Massachusetts Approved Amendments to Data Breach Notification Law

15. January 2019

Massachusetts’ data breach law has been significantly amended by the legislation signed by Gov. Charlie Baker on 10th January becoming effective as of 11th April this year. An overview of the key changes can be found following.

The amended law requires companies to provide certain additional information when notifying the Massachusetts Attorney General and the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation about a breach of security or the reasonable believe of the existence such a breach. This information include, but are not limited to “the nature of the breach of  security or unauthorized acquisition or use”, the types of personal information compromised (e.g. social security numbers), “the number of residents affected by the incident at the time of notification”, the person responsible for the breach – if known -, and whether the entity maintains a written information security program according to Massachusetts 201 CMR § 17.03.

A further update concerns the notice of the affected individuals. The amended law explicitly sets out a rolling notification to individuals under certain circumstances and prohibits therefore a company from delaying notice to affected individuals referring to the ground that the total number of individuals affected has not yet been determined. “In such case, and where otherwise necessary to update or correct the information required, a person or agency shall provide additional notice as soon as practicable and without unreasonable delay upon learning such additional information.”
If the company experiencing a data security incident is owned by another entity, the particular notification to the affected individual must specify “the name of the parent or affiliated corporation”.

Another significant change to the data breach law refers to the requirement of providing an offer of complimentary credit monitoring for “a period of not less than 18 months” (42 months, if the company is a consumer reporting agency) when a Massachusetts resident’s Social Security number has been compromised, or is reasonably believed to have been compromised, in a data security incident.  Also, Companies must certify their credit monitoring services to the Massachusetts attorney general and the Director of the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation in order to demonstrate compliance with the respective Massachusetts state law. Companies must eventually provide the credit monitoring services at no costs to the affected residents and are prohibited from asking them to waive their right to a private action as a condition for the reception of such services.

However, when these amendments become effective, beside Connecticut and Delaware, Massachusetts will have become one of those states providing a credit monitoring obligation when residents’ Social Security numbers are concerned by a breach of security. In fact, according to Public Act No. 18-90 that substitutes Senate Bill No. 472, Connecticut recently increased the required period of credit monitoring to be provided to the affected individuals from 12 to 24 months.

Massive data attack targeting hundreds of German politicians and celebrities

8. January 2019

Following the hacker attack on hundreds of politicians and celebrities, investigators have arrested a 20-year-old suspect today. The apartment of the suspect had been searched and he has been taken into custody. This was reported by the central agency of the attorney general in Frankfurt am Main (Zentralstelle zur Bekämpfung der Internetkriminalität der Generalstaatsanwaltschaft Frankfurt am Main) and the Federal Criminal Police Office (BKA).

On January 7, prior to the arrest, the household of a 19-year-old IT worker, who is being treated as a witness, was searched and technical equipment was confiscated. He claimed that he knows the hacker.

On Friday, January 4, Germany’s Federal Office for IT Safety (BSI) revealed that it was investigating a data leak concerning hundreds of German politicians, journalists and celebrities published on the platform Twitter. The authorities were working together with the Irish Data Protection Commissioner to stop the spreading of the affected data. The hack targeted all of Germany’s political parties represented in the federal parliament at the moment, except for the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD).

The data was published via a Twitter account, followed by more than 17,000 people at the time, in the style of an advent calendar over the course of December 2018. It included mobile phone numbers, contact info and private chats. Furthermore, ID cards as well as banking and financial details, for example credit card details, were leaked.

Update regarding the data breach at Marriott

7. January 2019

Marriott International Inc, the world’s largest hotel company, based in the USA, which was hit by a data breach in 2018, has announced new information regarding the breach in which unauthorized access to the Marriott subsidiary Starwood’s reservation database was made (we reported).

Contrary to initial statements, not 500 million records of hotel guests but only 383 million are affected. It should be noted that for a guest who has stayed several times in one of the hotels belonging to the Marriott Group, there is one record for each overnight stay. According to this, not 383 million people were affected, but fewer. However, the Marriott Group cannot give the exact number of people affected.

In addition to the corrected number of victims, Marriott announced that some confidential data such as passport and credit card numbers were unencrypted. About 5,25 million unencrypted and about 20,3 million encrypted passport numbers could be viewed by unauthorized persons. According to the company, the master key for decryption was not copied.

In addition, around 8,6 million encrypted credit card numbers were affected, of which only 345.000 were still valid. Here, too, the master key could not be captured. At the moment, it is still being investigated whether credit card numbers entered in the wrong fields and thus stored unencrypted are affected.

CNIL fines Telecom Operator

The French Data Protection Authority CNIL imposed a fine of €250.000,00 on telecom operator BOUYGUES TELECOM for not taking required security measures to protect the personal data of its clients.

BOUYGUES TELECOM offered their clients an option to create a profile on their webpage to have easier access to their contract details and telephone bills.

In March 2018, CNIL was informed that a lack of security measures gave free access to personal data of clients of B&You, a subsidiary company of BOUYGUES TELECOM. Each profile had its own URL address, which involved the first and last name of the client. Just by exchanging the name in the URL address, one gained free access to first and last name, date of birth, e-mail address, address and phone number as well as contracts and bills. The violation of data security went on for two years and had an impact on over two million clients.

Shortly after CNIL was informed, BOUYGUES TELECOM notified the data breach to CNIL. The company explained that the incident occurred after the computer code, which depends on user authentication, was deactivated for a test phase, but was forgotten to be re-activated after completion of the test phase. After noticing the data breach, the company quickly blocked the access to the personal data.

Nevertheless, CNIL stated that the company failed to protect the personal data of its clients and violated its obligation to take all required security measures, especially as appropriate measures would have revealed the data breach earlier.

As the incident occurred before the legal validity of GDPR, CNIL decided to impose a fine of €250.000,00 on BOUYGUES TELECOM.

Data breaches in US-American healthcare sector discovered

4. January 2019

In the last weeks, several data breaches in different US states were discovered. The latest one occurred in the Choice Rehabilitation Center based in Missouri. Data of 4,309 patients was breached in a hack on a corporate email account from July 1 until the end of September. Choice discovered the hack in November and started an investigation after consulting with Microsoft. Provider’s emails were forwarded to a personal account, which was later deactivated.

The sent emails contained billing data for different medical services such as physical or speech therapy services. These included for example patient names, medical record numbers, treatment information, diagnoses and the beginning and end of treatment dates.

Just a few weeks before, the largest healthcare breach of 2018 became public. Due to a cyberattack on the health’s systems billing vendor AccuDoc Solutions, data of more than 2.65 million Atrium Health patients was breached. AccuDoc Solutions prepares bills and operates the online billing system for Atrium Health, which is a hospital network that comprises 44 hospitals in Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.

The compromised database contained data of patients and guarantors, comprising full names, addresses, dates of birth, insurance policy details, medical record numbers, account balances and dates of service. 700,000 patient’s social security numbers were also among the hacked data.

However, financial data such as credit card numbers are not affected. Even though the data breach is contained to AccuDoc Solutions, Atrium Health has hired a team to investigate the occurrence and has reviewed its security precautions. Those patients whose Social Security numbers were hacked are being offered one year of free credit monitoring.

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