Tag: COVID-19

The rising threat of Ransomware

28. June 2021

Ransomware attacks are on a steep rise as the global pandemic continues. According to the cybersecurity firm SonicWall, there were more than 304 million attempted ransomware attacks tracked by them in 2020, which was a 62 percent increase over 2019. During the first five months of 2021, the firm detected another 116 percent increase in ransomware attempts compared to the same period in 2020. Another cybersecurity firm called Cybereason found in a recent study interviewing nearly 1,300 security professionals from all around the world that more than half of organisations have been the victim of a ransomware attack, and that 80 percent of businesses that decided to pay a ransom fee suffered a second ransomware attack, often times by the same cybercriminals.

Ransomware is a type of malicious software, which encrypts files, databases, or applications on a computer or network and perpetually holds them hostage or even threatens to publish data until the owner pays the attacker the requested fee. Captivated data may include Personal Data, business data and intellectual property. While Phishing attacks are the most common gateway for ransomware, there are also highly targeted attacks on financially strong companies and institutions (“Big game hunting”).

Alluding to the industry term Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), a new unlawful industry sub-branch has emerged in recent years, which according to security experts lowered the entrance barriers to this industry immensely: Ransomware-as-a-Service (RaaS). With RaaS, a typical monthly subscription could cost around 50 US-Dollars and the purchaser receives the ransomware code and decryption key. Sophisticated RaaS offerings even include customer service and dashboards that allow hackers to track the status of infections and the status of ransomware payments. Thus, cybercriminals do not necessarily have to have the technical skills themselves to create corresponding malware.

Experts point to various factors that are contributing to the recent increase in Ransomeware attacks. One factor is a consequence of the pandemic: the worldwide trend to work from home. Many companies and institutions were abruptly forced to introduce remote working and let employees use their own private equipment. Furthermore, many companies were not prepared to face the rising threats with respect to their cybersecurity management. Another reported factor has been the latest increase in value of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin which is the preferred currency by criminals for ransom payments.

Successful Ransomware attacks can lead to personal data breaches pursuant to Art. 4 No. 12 GDPR and can also lead to the subsequent obligation to report the data breach to the supervisory authorities (Art. 33 GDPR) and to the data subjects (Art. 34 GDPR) for the affected company. Businesses are called to implement appropriate technical and organisational measures based on the risk-based approach, Art. 32 GDPR.

Earlier this month, the Danish Data Protection Authority provided companies with practical guidance on how to mitigate the risk of ransomware attacks. Measures to ensure the ongoing confidentiality, integrity, availability and resilience of processing systems when faced with ransomware may include providing regular trainings for employees, having a high level of technical protection of systems and networks in place, patching programs in a timely manner, and storing backups in an environment other than the normal network.

The new Digital Green Certificate

31. May 2021

The EU Digital Covid certificate (Digital Green Certificate) is scheduled to come into use on July 1, 2021. The certificate is intended to make it possible to move freely within the EU once again. Within the member states, the certificate is also expected to allow access to public events and gastronomy. The certificate will complement and not replace the national passport, such as the yellow vaccination passport in Germany. However, it is up to each country to require additional health documents.

At the national level, software will be developed to meet the requirements of such a certificate. In parallel, a European gateway will be developed. This gateway will then be installed in a data center in Luxembourg. Countries such as Norway, Switzerland and Lichtenstein will also connect to the platform.

The certificate will document vaccination status, who has already recovered from a Covid-19 infection and it will also be able to record negative PCR tests. At the vaccination centers or doctors’ offices, personal data such as name, date of birth and vaccination date of the person concerned will be digitally recorded and signed with the digital signature key of the issuing body (hospital, test centre, etc.). The issued certificate contains a QR code with a digital signature to protect against falsification. During border control, the data stored and encrypted in the certificate should not be transmitted, but only the validity of the crypto keys is checked. To do this, the checking apps contact the EU gateway server in Luxembourg and query there whether the key stored in the QR code is reported as valid there. If this is the case, the checking app displays green as well as the name and date of birth of the traveler, who must therefore also present an identification document such as a passport. The participating EU countries, represented by the designated national authorities or official bodies are considered as joint controllers of the processing in the gateway and must therefore provide users with adequate information about the processing of their personal data in the European federation gateway in accordance with Article 13 of the GDPR.

Data protectionists criticize that the digital certificate and the collected data could be used by member states to create movement profiles of those affected. Central storage would also increase the risk of a hacker attack.

Data Breach made 136,000 COVID-19 test results publicly accessible

18. March 2021

Personal health data are considered a special category of personal data under Art. 9 of the GDPR and are therefore given special protections. A group of IT experts, including members of the German Chaos Computer Club (CCC), has now revealed security gaps in the software for test centres by which more than 136,000 COVID-19 test results of more than 80,000 data subjects have apparently been unprotected on the internet for weeks.

The IT-Security experts’ findings concern the software “SafePlay” of the Austrian company Medicus AI. Many test centres use this software to allocate appointments and to make test results digitally available to those tested. In fact, more than 100 test centres and mobile test teams in Germany and Austria are affected by the recent data breach. These include public facilities in Munich, Berlin, Mannheim as well as fixed and temporary testing stations in companies, schools and daycare centres.

In order to view the test results unlawfully, one only needed to create an account for a COVID-19 test. The URL for the test result contained the number of the test. If this number was simply counted up or down, the “test certificates” of other people became freely accessible. In addition to the test result, the test certificate also contained the name, date of birth, private address, nationality and ID number of the person concerned.

It remains unresolved whether the vulnerabilities have been exploited prior to the discovery by the CCC. The CCC notified both Medius AI and the Data Protection Authorities about the leak which led to a quick response by the company. However, IT experts and Privacy-focused NGOs commented that Medicus AI was irresponsible and grossly negligent with respect to their security measures leading to the potential disclosure of an enormous amount of sensitive personal health data.

Dutch data scandal: illegal trade of COVID-19 patient data

19. February 2021

In recent months, a RTL Nieuws reporter Daniël Verlaan has discovered widespread trade in the personal data of Dutch COVID-19 test subjects. He found ads consisting of photos of computer screens listing data of Dutch citizens. Apparently, the data had been offered for sale on various instant messaging apps such as Telegram, Snapchat and Wickr. The prices ranged from €30 to €50 per person. The data included home addresses, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth and BSN identifiers (Dutch social security number).

The personal data were registered in the two main IT systems of the Dutch Municipal Health Service (GGD) – CoronIT, containing details about citizens who took a COVID-19 test, and HPzone Light, a contact-tracing system, which contains the personal data of people infected with the coronavirus.

After becoming aware of the illegal trade, the GGD reported it to the Dutch Data Protection Authority and the police. The cybercrime team of the Midden-Nederland police immediately started an investigation. It showed that at least two GGD employees had maliciously stolen the data, as they had access to the official Dutch government COVID-19 systems and databases. Within 24 hours of the complaint, two men were arrested. Several days later, a third suspect was tracked down as well. The investigation continues, since the extent of the data theft is unclear and whether the suspects in fact managed to sell the data. Therefore, more arrests are certainly not excluded.

Chair of the Dutch Institute for Vulnerability Disclosure, Victor Gevers, told ZDNet in an interview:

Because people are working from home, they can easily take photos of their screens. This is one of the issues when your administrative staff is working from home.

Many people expressed their disapproval of the insufficient security measures concerning the COVID-19 systems. Since the databases include very sensitive data, the government has a duty to protect these properly in order to prevent criminal misuse. People must be able to rely on their personal data being treated confidentially.

In a press release, the Dutch police also raised awareness of the cybercrime risks, like scam or identity fraud. Moreover, they informed about the possibilities of protection against such crimes and the need to report them. This prevents victims and allows the police to immediately track down suspects and stop their criminal practices.

German Robert-Koch-Institute discusses mobile phone tracking to slow down the spreading of the Coronavirus

9. March 2020

According to a news report by the German newspaper “Der Tagesspiegel”, a small group of scientists at the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) and other institutions are currently discussing the evaluation and matching of movement data from mobile phones to detect people infected with the Coronavirus (COVID-19).

The scientists, who are trying to slow down the spreading of the disease, complain about the problem of the time-consuming and vague questionings of infected people on who they came in contact with. The evaluation and matching of mobile phone data may be more accurate and could speed up the process of identifying infected people, which could be essential for saving lives.

In a comment, the German Federal Commissioner for Data Protection Ulrich Kelber expressed that this procedure may cause large data protection issues, especially with regards to having a legal basis for processing and the proportionality of processing according to the GDPR.