Category: Belgian DPA

Belgian DPA imposes first fine since GDPR

11. June 2019

On 28 May 2019, the Belgian Data Protection Authority (DPA) imposed the first fine since the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force. The Belgian DPA fined a Belgian mayor 2.000 EUR for abusing use of personal data.

The Belgian DPA received a complaint from the data subjects alleging that their personal data collected for local administrative purposes had been further used by the mayor for election campaign purposes. The parties were then heard by the Litigation Chamber of the Belgian DPA. Finally, the Belgian DPA ruled that the mayor’s use of the plaintiff’s personal data violated the purpose limitation principle of the GDPR, since the personal data was originally collected for a different purpose and was incompatible with the purpose for which the mayor used the data.

In deciding on the amount of the fine, the Belgian DPA took into account the limited number of data subjects, the nature, gravity and duration of the infringement, resulting in a moderate sum of 2.000 EUR. Nevertheless, the decision conveys the message that compliance with the GDPR is the responsibility of each data controller, including public officials.

How to be prepared for the GPDR in 13 Steps

26. September 2016

Last week, the Belgian Data Protection Authority “Privacy Commission”, published Guidelines containing 13 Steps that will help organizations in order to prepare for the EU General Data Protection Regulation. The Guidelines were published in French and in Dutch.

The Belgian Data Protection Authority recommended to follow the steps shown below in order to be compliant with the GDPR:

  • Awareness: Instruct the relevant persons about the upcoming changes.
  • Internal Records: Document the stored data, where it came from and to whom it is transfered.
  • Privacy Notice: Review and update the Privacy Notice.
  • Individuals’ Rights: Check existing procedures in order to comply with individuals’ rights.
  • Access Requests: Review current procedures about access requests. Consider how these requests will be handled in accordance with the new GDPR time limits.
  • Legal Basis: Document all data processing procedures. Demonstrate the respective legal basis for each data processing procedure.
  • Consent: Review how consent is collected and recorded.
  • Children’s Personal Data: Plan procedures in order to verify the ages of individuals. Determine how to gather parental or legal guardian consent for processing procedures that involve children’s data.
  • Data Breach: Guarantee that procedures are implemented on how to handle data breaches.
  • Data Protection by Design and Data Protection Impact Assessments: Check these concepts. Consider how to implement them.
  • Data Protection Officer: Appoint and review the Data Protection Officer.
  • International: Check which Data Protection Authority will be responsible for you.
  • Existing Contracts: Review the current contracts.

Belgian DPA against Facebook for tracking of non-users

30. June 2016

The Belgian DPA sued Facebook about a year ago for tracking the online activities of non-users who visit the Facebook´s sites in Belgium without their consent.

In the first instance, the Court ruled that Facebook should stop tracking non-users without their consent or to face a fine of 250,000 euros per day. Facebook appealed this sentence to the Brussels Court of Appeal. The Court of Appeal has now stated that the Belgian DPA has no jurisdiction over Facebook Inc. The Belgian DPA will appeal to the Court of Cassation, which cannot deliver new sentences but throw out previous judgements.

In the meanwhile, Facebook has confirmed that it will not track non-users without their consent when they visit Facebook sites or click the “like” button.

Moreover, Facebook stated that only the Irish DPA has jurisdiction regarding data protection issues that involve Facebook´s use of EU citizens’ personal data, as this is where the European Headquarters are located.

After the decision of the Court of Appeal, the Belgian DPA said that the decision “simply and purely means that the Belgian citizen cannot obtain the protection of his private life through the courts and tribunals when it concerns foreign actors”.