Tag: disclosure of personal data

Admonition for revealing a list of people quarantined in Poland

27. November 2020

The President of the Personal Data Protection Office in Poland (UODO) imposed an admonition on a company dealing with waste management liable for a data breach and ordered to notify the concerned data subjects. The admonition is based on a violation of personal data pertaining to data subjects under medical quarantine. The city name, street name, building/flat number and the fact of remaining under quarantine of the affected data subjects have been provided by the company to unauthorized recipients. The various recipients were required to verify whether, in a given period, waste was to be collected from places determined in the above-mentioned list.

The incident already happened in April 2020. Back then, a list of data subjects was made public, containing information on who had been quarantined by the administrative decision of the District Sanitary-Epidemiological Station (PPIS) in Gniezno as well as information on quarantined data subjects in connection with crossing the country border and on data subjects undergoing home isolation due to a confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. After becoming aware of the revelation, the Director of PPIS notified the relevant authorities – the District Prosecutor’s Office and the President of UODO – about the incident.

PPIS informed them that it had carried out explanatory activities showing that the source of disclosure of these data was not PPIS. These data were provided to the District Police Headquarters, the Head of the Polish Post Office, Social Welfare Centres and the Headquarters of the State Fire Service. Considering the fact that these data had been processed by various parties involved, it was necessary to establish in which of them the breach may have occurred.

UODO took steps to clarify the situation. In the course of the proceedings, it requested information from a company dealing with waste management being one of the recipients of the personal data. The company, acting as the data controller, had to explain whether, when establishing the procedures related to the processing of personal data, it had carried out an assessment of the impact of the envisaged processing operations on the protection of personal data according to Art. 35 GDPR. The assessment persists in an analysis of the distribution method in electronic and paper form in terms of risks related to the loss of confidentiality. Furthermore, the data controller had to inform UODO about the result of this analysis.

The data controller stated that it had conducted an analysis considering the circumstances related to non-compliance with the procedures in force by data processors and circumstances related to theft or removal of data. Moreover, the data controller expressed the view that the list, received from the District Police Headquarters, only included administrative (police) addresses and did not contain names, surnames and other data allowing the identification of a natural person. Thus, the GDPR would not apply, because the data has to be seen as anonymized. However, from the list also emerged the fact that residents of these buildings/flats were placed in quarantine, which made it possible to identify them. It came out that the confidentiality of the processed data had been violated in the course of the performance of employee duties of the data processor, who had left the printed list on the desk without proper supervision. During this time, another employee had recorded the list in the form of a photo and had shared it with another person.

Following the review of the entirety of the collected material in this case, UODO considered that the information regarding the city name, street name, building/flat number and placing a data subject in medical quarantine, constitute personal data within the meaning of Art. 4 (1) GDPR, while the last comprises a special category of personal data concerning health according to Art. 9 (1) GDPR. Based on the above, it is possible to identify the data subjects, and therefore the data controller is bound to the obligations arising from the GDPR.

In the opinion of UODO, the protective measures indicated in the risk analysis are general formulations, which do not refer to specific activities undertaken by authorized employees. The measures are insufficient and inadequate to the risks of processing special categories of data. In addition, the data controller should have considered factors, such as recklessness and carelessness of employees and a lack of due diligence.

According to Art. 33 (1) GDPR, the data controller shall without undue delay and, where feasible, not later than 72 hours after having become aware of the data breach, notify it to the competent supervisory authority. Moreover, in a situation of high risk to the rights and freedoms of the data subjects, resulting from the data breach (which undoubtedly arose from the disclosure), the data controller is obliged to inform the data subject without undue delay in accordance with Art. 34 (1) GDPR. Despite this, the company did not report the infringement, neither to the President of UODO nor to the concerned data subjects.

Poland: Addresses of judges, politicians and pro-life activists published on Twitter

12. November 2020

In recent days, social networks in Poland have teemed with posts containing private addresses and telephone numbers of judges of the Constitutional Tribunal, politicians and activists openly supporting the abortion sentence. In conjunction with the publication of the above on Twitter, the President of the Personal Data Protection Office (UODO) took immediate steps to protect the personal data and privacy of these persons.

Background to this was the judgement of the Constitutional Tribunal repealing the provisions allowing abortion in cases of, for example, serious genetic defects or severe impairment of the human fetus. This provoked resistance from a part of Polish society and led to a street revolution of “liberal” men and women. Unfortunately, the agitation turned into invectives, destruction of property, public disorder and personal arguments. As a result, personal data of people supporting the prohibition of abortion have been shared thousands of times on all social media too. For this reason, numerous protesters appeared at the indicated houses, covered the walls of the surrounding buildings with vulgar inscriptions, and the addressees began to receive packages, e.g. with a set of hangers.

On October 29th, 2020 the President of the UODO responded to the case:

Publishing private addresses and contact details of pro-life activists, politicians and judges by users of the Twitter social network is an action leading to the disclosure of a wide sphere of privacy, and thus posing threats to health and life, such as possible acts of violence and aggression directed against these people and their family members.

The announcement stated that the President of the UODO requested an immediate procedure by the Irish supervisory authority, which is responsible for the processing of personal data via Twitter. Pointing out the enormous scale of threats, he indicated the need to verify the response time to reported irregularities and the possibility of introducing automated solutions to prevent the rapid furtherance of such content by other portal users. He also notified the law enforcement authorities that Twitter users had committed a crime consisting in the processing of personal data without a legal basis. The lawfulness had neither been guaranteed by consent according to Art. 6 (1) lit. a GDPR nor legitimate interests pursuant to Art. 6 (1) lit. f GDPR or any other legal basis. Thus, the processing has to be seen as illegitimate as also stated by the President of the UODO. The law enforcement authorities will be obliged to examine and document both the scope of personal data disclosed in a way that violates the principles of personal data protection and to determine the group of entities responsible for unlawful data processing. The President of the UODO also applied to the Minister of Justice – Public Prosecutor General for placing this case under special supervision due to the escalation of conflict and aggression, which pose a high risk of violating the life interests of both people whose data is published on social media and their family members.

In conclusion, the President of the UODO added:

The intensification of actions of all competent authorities in this matter is necessary due to the unprecedented nature of the violations and the alarming announcements of disclosing the data of more people, as well as the deepening wave of aggression.