Tag: data protection

Record GDPR fine by the Hungarian Data Protection Authority for the unlawful use of AI

22. April 2022

The Hungarian Data Protection Authority (Nemzeti Adatvédelmi és Információszabadság Hatóság, NAIH) has recently published its annual report in which it presented a case where the Authority imposed the highest fine to date of ca. €670,000 (HUF 250 million).

This case involved the processing of personal data by a bank that acted as a data controller. The controller automatically analyzed recorded audio of costumer calls. It used the results of the analysis to determine which customers should be called back by analyzing the emotional state of the caller using an artificial intelligence-based speech signal processing software that automatically analyzed the call based on a list of keywords and the emotional state of the caller. The software then established a ranking of the calls serving as a recommendation as to which caller should be called back as a priority.

The bank justified the processing on the basis of its legitimate interests in retaining its customers and improving the efficiency of its internal operations.

According to the bank this procedure aimed at quality control, in particular at the prevention of customer complaints. However, the Authority held that the bank’s privacy notice referred to these processing activities in general terms only, and no material information was made available regarding the voice analysis itself. Furthermore, the privacy notice only indicated quality control and complaint prevention as purposes of the data processing.

In addition, the Authority highlighted that while the Bank had conducted a data protection impact assessment and found that the processing posed a high risk to data subjects due to its ability to profile and perform assessments, the data protection impact assessment did not provide substantive solutions to address these risks. The Authority also emphasized that the legal basis of legitimate interest cannot serve as a “last resort” when all other legal bases are inapplicable, and therefore data controllers cannot rely on this legal basis at any time and for any reason. Consequently, the Authority not only imposed a record fine, but also required the bank to stop analyzing emotions in the context of speech analysis.

 

Google launches “Reject All” button on cookie banners

After being hit with a €150 million fine by France’s data protection agency CNIL earlier in the year for making the process of rejecting cookies unnecessarily confusing and convoluted for users, Google has added a new “Reject All” button to the cookie consent banners that have become ubiquitous on websites in Europe. Users visiting Search and YouTube in Europe while signed out or in incognito mode will soon see an updated cookie dialogue with reject all and accept all buttons.

Previously, users only had two options: “I accept” and “personalize.” While this allowed users to accept all cookies with a single click, they had to navigate through various menus and options if they wanted to reject all cookies. “This update, which began rolling out earlier this month on YouTube, will provide you with equal “Reject All” and “Accept All” buttons on the first screen in your preferred language,” wrote Google product manager Sammit Adhya in a blog post.

According to Google they have kicked off the rollout of the new cookie banner in France and will be extending the change to all Google users in Europe, the U.K., and Switzerland soon.

Google’s plan to include a “Reject All” button on cookie banners after its existing policy violated EU law was also welcomed by Hamburg’s Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information Thomas Fuchs during a presentation of his 2021 activity report.

But the introduction of the “Reject All” button is likely to be only an interim solution because the US giant already presented far-reaching plans at the end of January to altogether remove Google cookies from third-party providers by 2023.

Instead of cookies, the internet giant wants to rely on in-house tracking technology for the Google Privacy Sandbox project.

European Commission and United States agree in principle on Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework

29. March 2022

On March 25th, 2022, the United States and the European Commission have committed to a new Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework that aims at taking the place of the previous Privacy Shield framework.

The White House stated that the Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework “will foster trans-Atlantic data flows and address the concerns raised by the Court of Justice of the European Union when it struck down in 2020 the Commission’s adequacy decision underlying the EU-US Privacy Shield framework”.

According to the joint statement of the US and the European Commission, “under the Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework, the United States is to put in place new safeguards to ensure that signals surveillance activities are necessary and proportionate in the pursuit of defined national security objectives, establish a two-level independent redress mechanism with binding authority to direct remedial measures, and enhance rigorous and layered oversight of signals intelligence activities to ensure compliance with limitations on surveillance activities”.

This new Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework has been a strenuous work in the making and reflects more than a year of detailed negotiations between the US and EU led by Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo and Commissioner for Justice Didier Reynders.

It is hoped that this new framework will provide a durable basis for the data flows between the EU and the US, and underscores the shared commitment to privacy, data protection, the rule of law, and the collective security.

Like the Privacy Shield before, this new framework will represent a self-certification with the US Department of Commerce. Therefore, it will be crucial for data exporters in the EU to ensure that their data importers are certified under the new framework.

The establishment of a new “Data Protection Review Court” will be the responsible department in cases of the new two-tier redress system that will allow EU citizens to raise complaints in cases of access of their data by US intelligence authorities, aiming at investigating and resolving the complaints.

The US’ commitments will be concluded by an Executive Order, which will form the basis of the adequacy decision by the European Commission to put the new framework in place. While this represents a quicker solution to reach the goal, it also means that Executive Orders can be easily repealed by the next government of the US. Therefore, it remains to be seen if this new framework, so far only agreed upon in principle, will bring the much hoped closure on the topic of trans-Atlantic data flows that is intended to bring.

Belgian DPA declares technical standard used for cookie banner for consent requests illegal

28. March 2022

In a long-awaited decision on the Transparency and Consent Framework (TCF), the Belgian data protection authority APD concludes that this technical standard, which advertisers use to collect consent for targeted advertising on the Internet, does not comply with the principles of legality and fairness. Accordingly, it violates the GDPR.

The ADP’s decision is aligned with other European data protection authorities and has consequences for cookie banners and behavioral online advertising in the EU. The advertising association IAB Europe, which develops and operates the TCF system, must now delete the personal data collected in this way and pay a fine of 250,000 euros. In addition, conditions have been determined for the advertising industry under which the TCF may continue to be used at all.

Almost all companies, including advertising companies such as Google or Amazon, use the mechanism to pass on users’ presumed consent to the processing of their personal data for personalized advertising purposes. This decision will have a major impact on the protection of users’ personal data. This is also confirmed by Hielke Hijmans from APD.

The basic structure of the targeted advertising system is that each visit to a participating website triggers an auction among the providers of advertisements. Based on the desired prices and the user’s data profile, among other things, a decision is made in milliseconds as to which advertisements she will see. For this real-time bidding (RTB) to work, the advertising companies collect data to compile target groups for ads.

If users accept cookies or do not object that the use of their data is in the legitimate interest of the provider, the TCF generates a so-called TC string, which contains information about consent decisions. This identifier forms the basis for the creation of individual profiles and for the auctions in which advertising spaces and, with them, the attention of the desired target group are auctioned off, and is forwarded to partners in the OpenRTB system.

According to the authority, the TC strings already constitute personal data because they enable users to be identified with the IP address and the cookies set by the TCF. In addition, IAB Europe is said to be jointly legally responsible for any data processing via the framework, although IAB Europe has not positioned itself as a data processor, only as a provider of a standard.
The TCF envisions advertising providers invoking a “legitimate interest” in data collection in cookie banners that pop up all the time, rather than asking for consent. This would have to be prohibited, for example, for it to be lawful. The principles of privacy by design and by default are also violated, since consent is literally tricked by design tricks, the data flows are not manageable, and revocation of consent is hardly possible.

Google to launch Google Analytics 4 with aim to address EU Data Protection concerns

24. March 2022

On March 16, 2022, Google announced the launch of its new analytics solution, “Google Analytics 4”. Among other things, “Google Analytics 4” aims to address the most recent data protection developments regarding the use of analytical cookies and the transfers tied to such processing.

The announcement of this new launch comes following 101 complaints made by the non-governmental organization None of Your Business (NOYB) complaints with 30 EEA countries’ data protection authorities (DPA). Assessing the data transfer from the EU to the US after the Schrems II decision of the CJEU for the use of Google Analytics, the French and Austrian DPAs ruled that the transfer of EU personal data from the EU to the U.S. through the use of the Google Analytics cookies is unlawful under the GDPR.

In the press release, Google states that “Google Analytics 4 is designed with privacy at its core to provide a better experience for both our customers and their users. It helps businesses meet evolving needs and user expectations, with more comprehensive and granular controls for data collection and usage.”

However, the most important change that the launch of “Google Analytics 4” will have on the processing of personal data is that it will no longer store users’ IP addresses. This will limit the data processing and resulting transfers that Google Analytics was under scrutiny for in the EU, however it is unclear at this point if the EU DPAs will change their opinion on the use of Google Analytics with this new version.

According to the press release, the current Google Analytics will be suspended starting July 2023, and Google is recommending companies to move onto “Google Analytics 4” as soon as possible.

Artificial intelligence in business operations poses problems in terms of GDPR compliance

25. February 2022

With the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation, the intention was to protect personal data and to minimize the processing of such data to the absolutely necessary extent. Processing should be possible for a specific, well-defined purpose.

In the age of technology, it is particularly practical to access artificial intelligence, especially in everyday business, and use it to optimize business processes. More and more companies are looking for solutions based on artificial intelligence. This generally involves processing significant amounts of personal data.

In order for artificial intelligence to be implementable at all, this system must first be given a lot of data to store so that it can learn from it and thus make its own decisions.

When using so-called “machine learning”, which forms a subset of artificial intelligence, care must be taken as to whether and what data is processed so that it is in compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation.

If a company receives data for further processing and analysis, or if it shares data for this purpose, there must be mutual clarity regarding this processing.

The use of artificial intelligence faces significant challenges in terms of compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation. These are primarily compliance with the principles of transparency, purpose limitation and data minimization.

In addition, the data protection impact assessment required by the General Data Protection Regulation also poses problems with regard to artificial intelligence, as artificial intelligence is a self-learning system that can make its own decisions. Thus, some of these decisions may not be understandable or predictable.

In summary, there is a strong tension between artificial intelligence and data privacy.

Many companies are trying to get around this problem with the so-called “crowd sourcing” solution. This involves the development of anonymized data, which is additionally provided with a fuzziness instead of being able to trace it back to a person.

Norwegian DPA aims to strengthen cookie regulations

22. February 2022

The Norwegian Data Protection Authority (DPA), Datatilsynet, has reached out to the Ministry of Local Government and District Affairs in a letter emphasizing the requirement of tightening cookie regulations in Norway.

This letter comes amid voices of consulting committees to delay the proposed tightened cookie regulations which have been on open consultation in Norway since the end of last year.

In the letter, the Datatilsynet points out the importance of strengthened cookie laws, specifically regarding the manner of obtaining consent and the design of the consent banners, which “are designed in ways that influence users to consent by making it more cumbersome and time consuming to not consent”.

The letter also references the French data protection authority’s decisions to fine Google €150 million and Facebook €60 million for inadequately facilitating refusal of cookies, as issued on 31 December 2021, and clearly outlined that in contrast to the practices for which Google and Facebook had been fined in France, the cookie practices would hardly have been considered problematic under the Norwegian cookie regulations, where illusory consents are allowed through pre-set browser settings.

Senior Legal Advisor Anders Obrestad stated that “these cases illustrate how unsustainable the current regulation of cookies and similar sports technologies in Norway are for the privacy of internet users”.

The Norwegian DPA hopes to be able to stop any delay in the strengthening of cookie regulations, as well as emphasize the importance of valid consent of internet users.

CNIL posts guidance on use of third-party cookie alternatives

16. December 2021

France’s data protection authority, the Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertés (CNIL), has published a guidance on the use of alternatives to third-party cookies.

The guidance aims to highlight that there are other ways to track users online than through third-party cookies, and that it is important to apply data protection principles to new technologies with tracking ability.

In the guidance, the CNIL gives an overview on what cookies are and the difference between first-party and third-party cookies, as well as the meaning of the two for personalized advertisement targeting.

It also highlights consent management and collection as being the key role to ensure a data protection compliant online tracking culture for new tracking methods and technologies. Further, the guidance also emphasizes that consent is not the only important requirement. In addition, online tracking and targeting methods should ensure that users keep control of their data and that all data subject rights are allowed and facilitated.

In light of this, the CNIL has gone ahead and published a guide for developers to help outline how to implement data protection compliant third-party cookies and other tracers in order to sensibilize people that are part of the implementation process as to how to stay compliant.

However, the CNIL also issued about 60 cookie compliance notices and 30 new orders to organizations for not offering users a data protection compliant ability to refuse cookies.

The CNIL has stepped up efforts to tackle cookie management and consent in order to ensure the rights and freedom of the data subjects in relation to their personal data online are kept safe. It has made clear that cookies are its main focus for the upcoming year, and that it will continue to hold companies liable for their insufficient data protection implementation.

EDPB adopts new Guidelines on restrictions of data subject rights under Article 23 GDPR

25. October 2021

During its plenary session of October 2021, the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) adopted a final version of the Guidelines on restrictions of data subject rights under Art. 23 of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) following public consultation.

The Guidelines “provide a thorough analysis of the criteria to apply restrictions, the assessments that need to be observed, how data subjects can exercise their rights after the restrictions are lifted, and the consequences of infringements of Art. 23 GDPR,” the EDPB stated in their press release.

Further, the Guidelines aim to analyze how the legislative measures setting out the restrictions need to meet the foreseeability requirement and examine the grounds for the restrictions listed by Art. 23(1) GDPR, as well as the obligations and rights which may be restricted.

These Guidelines hope to recall the conditions surrounding the use of the restrictions by the Member States in light of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, and to guide Member States if they wish to implement restrictions under national law.

The EU Whistleblowing Directive – An Overview

29. September 2021

The EU Whistleblower Directive was published in December 2019 and introduces minimum standards for the protection of individuals reporting breaches of EU law governing different areas of public interest, which are specified in the annex to the EU Whistleblower Directive. These include inter alia privacy and personal data protection as well as security of network information systems. The Directive aims to protect individuals who have become aware of such breaches in a work-related context, irrespective of their status from an employment law prospective. Employees, civil servants, self-employed service providers, freelance workers as well as volunteers and trainees and even shareholders will now be protected under the Whistleblower Directive.

Status of implementation in the EU Member states

EU member states are obliged to adapt the Whistleblower Directive into national law until December 17th, 2021. So far, the implementation is in process for at least 21 Member States.

Legislative proposals have been drafted in the following member states, and are up for discussion in their respective parliaments:

  • Belgium,
  • the Czech Republic,
  • Denmark,
  • France,
  • Romania,
  • the Netherlands.

First legislative steps have been taken in the following member states, where drafts are currently being planned or prepared:

  • Bulgaria,
  • Croatia,
  • Estonia,
  • Finland,
  • Greece,
  • Ireland,
  • Latvia,
  • Lithuania,
  • Poland,
  • Portugal.

Slovakia and Slovenia have enacted laws in first reaction to the Directive, however new laws for a full implementation are underway. In Germany, there is currently no comprehensive law that implements the Whistleblower Directive. At the time of this writing, a number of proposals are in development. The concrete implementation of the Directive in Germany has remained controversial between the governing parties. A draft bill of the Whistleblower Protection Act (Hinweisgeberschutzgesetz) submitted by the Federal Ministry of Justice was rejected within the government at the end of April 2021 because it provided for stricter regulations than the EU Directive.  A new draft is yet to be passed on to the next stage.

Naturally, operating channels and procedures for internal reporting of EU law breaches will inevitably involve the processing of personal data, and the EU legislators were clearly aware of the consequences, as the Whistleblower Directive generally states that any processing of personal data pursuant to the Whistleblower Directive must be carried out in accordance with EU data protection law and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in particular.

What this means for companies in the EU

In order for companies to understand how to comply with the EU Whistleblower Directive, it is important for businesses to keep the following data protection elements in mind:

  • Handle reports and the personal data of the reporter/whistleblower according to the principles of Art. 5 GDPR: lawfulness, fairness, transparency, purpose limitation, data minimisation, accuracy, storage limitation, integrity, confidentiality and accountability;
  • Have a legal basis for the processing of personal data and whistleblower reports (in this case Art. 6 para. 1 lit. c GDPR plus if applicable national data protection law in conjunction with the EU Whistleblower Directive);
  • Purpose limitation and data minimization for reports through Privacy by Design and Default (configuration of the reporting tool in a way that allows only data relevant to the report to be collected, irrelevant data should be deleted without undue delay);
  • Limit access to the reports by responsible employees only based on a strict and detailed authorization concept (Need-to-Know basis);
  • Ensure that the identity of the reporter/whistleblower remains confidential;
  • Inform all (potential) reporters/whistleblowers about the data processing activity in relation to the report and the following investigation process according to Art. 13 GDPR and the protection of their identity (preferably implemented in the reporting tools, so that the reporter/whistleblower is properly informed);
  • Documentation of the processing activity in a Record of Processing Activities according to Art. 30 GDPR;
  • Enter into GDPR compliant Data Processing Agreements with relevant service providers, if applicable;
  • Have applicable and GDPR compliant Technical and Organizational Measures in place;
  • Have a Retention Schedule in place (recommended deletion of personal data within two months after completion of the investigation unless legal proceedings follow);
  • Keep reports local unless necessary to disclose to other group entities due to the reports affecting other locations.

To date, there is very little official guidance available from EU data protection regulators. Sooner or later, EU data protection regulators will have to either issue updated guidance before the transposition laws at EU Member State level kick in or will encourage industry stakeholders to draw up a code of conduct for whistleblower reporting.

On the business side, successful implementation can protect your business and promote a better workplace culture. The Directive establishes three options for the reporting of information by whistleblowers:

  • Internal reporting channel within the business which are mandatory according to the Directive for businesses with 50 or more employees,
  • External reporting Channels facilitated through relevant authorities on a national or EU-level,
  • Under certain circumstances, the whistleblower can decide to publicly report the information, e.g. via social media.

These channels can either be:

  • Written – online reporting platform, email or post,
  • Verbal – phone hotline with messaging system or in-person.

We recommend staying updated on the developments on the EU Whistleblower Directive and the status of implementation within the EU member states. In the meantime, if you have questions on how the EU Whistleblower Directive might impact your business in Germany and the EU, do not hesitate to contact us.

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