Tag: Brexit

EU Commission highlights necessary preparations for end of Brexit transitioning period

14. July 2020

The European Commission has published a communication on July 9th, 2020, in order to highlight the main areas of change in view of the upcoming end of the transitional Brexit period before January 1st, 2021.

The communication aims to facilitate readiness and preparations for citizens, businesses and stockholders once the UK leaves the European Union. The European Commission states that readiness for these broad and far reaching changes is key, especially since they will take place regardless of the outcome of the negotiations between the UK and the EU.

The communication breaches subjects such as trade in goods, trade in services, energy, travelling and tourism, mobility and social security coordination, company law and civil law, intellectual property, data transfers and protection and international agreements of the EU.

The communication also includes advice in each of those areas and subjects for businesses to be able to start preparations in order to cope with the changes ahead.

With a view on data protection, the European Commission’s communication states that data transfers can continue after January 1st, 2021, however they will have to comply with EU rules and regulations for Third Country Transfers as put forth by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The Commission specifies the tools set out in Chapter V of the GDPR, which include Binding Corporate Rules, Standard Contractual Clauses, as well as an Adequacy Decision by the European Commission. The communication states that the EU will try its best to conclude the assessment of the UK regime by the end of 2020, in order to give at least some form of security for data transfers after the transitional period ends. On sides of the United Kingdom, the Adequacy of the European union is guaranteed until 2024.

The advice of the European Commission emphasizes compliancy with the GDPR as the best preparation for the Brexit, but lacks security as to what will happen on January 1st, 2021, especially with regards to the future applicable laws.

EDPB shares concerns over UK-US data deal in light of future UK adequacy decision

18. June 2020

On June 17th, 2020, the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has written an open letter to the Members of the European Parliament over its concerns regarding the Agreement between the United Kingdom (UK) and the USA on Access to Electronic Data for the Purpose of Countering Serious Crime in relation to a future UK adequacy decision after the country’s exit out of the European Union.

In its letter, the EDPB states that it is concerned with the applicability of the safeguards in the Brexit withdrawal agreement with the EU once the UK leaves the Union at the beginning of 2021. The Agreement between the UK and the US allows for easy data access in the case of the prosecution of serious crimes, and facilitates an access request to be made to UK authorities and businesses under the US Cloud Act, for which it is unsure if the safeguards agreed upon between the EU and the UK apply.

The EDPB also stresses that, in the light of a potential data sharing agreement between the EU and the US, it is mandatory that the European safeguards in such an agreement “must prevail over US domestic laws” in order to be “fully compatible with European laws”.

Furthermore, the letter also states that “it is also essential that the safeguards include a mandatory prior judicial authorisation as an essential guarantee for access to metadata and content data”. In its preliminary assessment, the EDPB could not distinguish such a provision in the UK-US Agreement.

While right now the EDPB can only make a preliminary assessment of the situation based on the current elements at its disposal, it states clearly that the Agreement between the UK and the US will have to be considered in any relevant adequacy decision in the future. This is especially important as there is a “requirement to ensure continuity of protection in cases of onwards transfers from the UK to another third country”.

In any case, the EDPB intends to release its own opinion on the matter if the European Commission should release a draft of the adequacy decision for the UK.

EDPS publishes opinion on future EU-UK partnership

3. March 2020

On 24 February 2020, the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) published an opinion on the opening of negotiations for the future partnership between the EU and the UK with regards to personal data protection.

In his opinion, the EDPS points out the importance of commitments to fully respect fundamental rights in the future envisaged comprehensive partnership. Especially with regards to the protection of personal data, the partnership shall uphold the high protection level of the EU’s personal data rules.

With respect to the transfer of personal data, the EDPS further expresses support for the EU Commission’s recommendation to work towards the adoption of adequacy decisions for the UK if the relevant conditions are met. However, the Commission must ensure that the UK is not lowering its data protection standard below the EU standard after the Brexit transition period. Lastly, the EDPS recommends the EU Institutions to also prepare for a potential scenario in which no adequacy decisions exist by the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020.

CNIL updates its FAQs for case of a No-Deal Brexit

24. September 2019

The French data protection authority “CNIL” updated its existing catalogue of questions and answers (“FAQs”) to inform about the impact of a no-deal brexit and how controllers should prepare for the transfer of data from the EU to the UK.

As things stand, the United Kingdom will leave the European Union on 1st of November 2019. The UK will then be considered a third country for the purposes of the European General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”). For this reason, after the exit, data transfer mechanisms become necessary to transfer personal data from the EU to the UK.

The FAQs recommend five steps that entities should take when transferring data to a controller or processor in the UK to ensure compliance with GDPR:

1. Identify processing activities that involve the transfer of personal data to the United Kingdom.
2. Determine the most appropriate transfer mechanism to implement for these processing activities.
3. Implement the chosen transfer mechanism so that it is applicable and effective as of November 1, 2019.
4. Update your internal documents to include transfers to the United Kingdom as of November 1, 2019.
5. If necessary, update relevant privacy notices to indicate the existence of transfers of data outside the EU and EEA where the United Kingdom is concerned.

CNIL also discusses the GDPR-compliant data transfer mechanisms (e.g., standard contractual clauses, binding corporate rules, codes of conduct) and points out that, whichever one is chosen, it must take effect on 1st of November. If controllers should choose a derogation admissible according to GDPR, CNIL stresses that this must strictly comply with the requirements of Art. 49 GDPR.

Brexit: Deal or “No-deal”

12. March 2019

Yesterday evening, shortly before the vote of the UK parliament on the circumstances and if necessary a postponement of the Brexit, Theresa May met again with Jean-Claude Juncker in Strasbourg. Both sides could agree on “clarifications and legal guarantees” regarding the fall-back solution for Northern Ireland.

These (slightly) expand the United Kingdom’s (UK) opportunity to appeal to an arbitration court in the event that the EU should “hold the UK hostage” in terms of the membership of the customs union by means of the Backstop-Clause beyond 2020. This “legally binding instrument”, as Juncker said, intends to clarify that the Backstop-Clause on the Irish border is not to be regarded as a permanent solution. This shall also be confirmed in a joint political declaration on the future relations between the two sides. However, the wording of the complementary regulation is legally vague.

May is nevertheless confident that the British Parliament will approve the “new” agreement to be voted on tonight. Meanwhile, Jeremy Corbyn, Labour Party leader, has announced and urged to vote against the agreement. In any case, Juncker has already rejected further negotiations on adjustments to the current version of the withdrawal agreement, emphasizing that there will be no “third chance”. By 23rd May, when the EU elections begin, the Kingdom shall have left the EU.

The vote on “how” and “when” of the Brexit will be taken in the next few days, starting tonight at 8 p.m. CET. If the withdrawal agreement will be rejected again today, the parliament will vote on a no-deal Brexit tomorrow (the UK would then be a third country in the sense of the GDPR as of 30th March). In case this will also be rejected, on 14th March the parliament will eventually vote on a delay of the Brexit date. A postponement could then lead to a new referendum and thus to a renewed decision on the question of “whether” a Brexit will actually take place.

Category: EU · GDPR · General · UK
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EDPB publishes information note on data transfer in the event of a no-deal Brexit

25. February 2019

The European Data Protection Board has published an information note to explain data transfer to organisations and facilitate preparation in the event that no agreement is reached between the EEA and the UK. In case of a no-deal Brexit, the UK becomes a third country for which – as things stand at present – no adequacy decision exists.

EDPB recommends that organisations transferring data to the UK carry out the following five preparation steps:

• Identify what processing activities will imply a personal data transfer to the UK
• Determine the appropriate data transfer instrument for your situation
• Implement the chosen data transfer instrument to be ready for 30 March 2019
• Indicate in your internal documentation that transfers will be made to the UK
• Update your privacy notice accordingly to inform individuals

In addition, EDPB explains which instruments can be used to transfer data to the UK:
– Standard or ad hoc Data Protection Clauses approved by the European Commission can be used.
– Binding Corporate Rules for data processing can be defined.
– A code of conduct or certification mechanism can be established.

Derogations are possible in the cases mentioned by article 49 GDPR. However, they are interpreted very restrictively and mainly relate to processing activities that are occasional and non-repetitive. Further explanations on available derogations and how to apply them can be found in the EDPB Guidelines on Article 49 of GDPR.

The French data protection authority CNIL has published an FAQ based on the information note of the EDPB, explaining the consequences of a no-deal Brexit for the data transfer to the UK and which preparations should be made.

The European Data Protection Board presents Work Program for 2019/2020

14. February 2019

On February 12, 2019 the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) released on their website a document containing a two-year Work Program.

The EDPB acts as an independent European body and is established by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The board is formed of representatives of the national EU and EEA EFTA data protection supervisory authorities, and the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS).

The tasks of the EDPB are to issue guidelines on the interpretation of key ideas of the GDPR as well as the ruling by binding decisions on disputes regarding cross-border processing activities. Its objective is to ensure a consistent application of EU rules to avoid the same case potentially being dealt with differently across various jurisdictions. It promotes cooperation between EEA EFTA and the EU data protection supervisory authorities.

The EDPB work program is based on the needs identified by the members as priority for individuals, stakeholders, as well as the EU legislator- planned activities. It contains Guidelines, Consistency opinions, other types of activities, recurrent activities and possible topics.

Furthermore, the EDPB released an information note about data transfers if a no-deal Brexit occurs. As discussed earlier, in this case the UK will become a so-called “third country” for EU member countries beginning from March 30. According to the UK Government, the transfer of data from the UK to the EEA will remain unaffected, permitting personal data to flow freely in the future.

Brexit: Impact on data protection after “May’s deal” has been rejected

18. January 2019

Prime Minister Theresa May’s draft withdrawal agreement to regulate Brexit was rejected by a clear majority of parliamentarians on 15th January. The draft withdrawal agreement has been agreed in November 2018 by the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU) – we reported: Brexit: Draft withdrawal agreement – GDPR remains applicable for foreseeable future – containing a transition period of 21-months in order to facilitate business sectors in their planning. Because of the recent rejection of the withdrawal agreement by the British Parliament, the scenario of the UK disorderly leaving the EU has now become quite likely. Among various economic and EU law issues, Brexit has also a concrete impact on data protection.

In case of a Brexit without corresponding transitional rules, the UK would be regarded as a third country under the General Data Protection Regulation of the EU (GDPR) as of 29th March 2019. This was also confirmed by Prof. Dr. Dieter Kugelmann, the State Data Protection Officer of Rheinland-Pfalz: “The fact is that the United Kingdom will become a “third country” within the meaning of the GDPR after leaving the EU.” Thus, an adaquacy decision would be required to transfer personal data of EU citizens or from the EU to the UK in the absence of any other mechanisms ensuring an adequate level of data protection according to Art. 44 ff. GDPR.

Since many companies currently transfer customer or employee data to the UK as well as a lot of data centres of service providers are located there, the Brexit will cause a need for adaption in terms of data protection matters. After the Brexit these Companies must ensure that there is an adequate legal basis for the relevant data transfers to the UK. Furthermore, according to Art. 13, 14 GDPR, the data subjects must be informed regarding the transfer of personal data outside the EU/EEA. All privacy policies on websites, privacy notices to employees etc. therefore would have to be adjusted. In the event of a data subject’s request for information, Art. 15 GDPR stipulates that the data subject must be informed about the transfer of his/her personal data to a third country. When personal data are transferred to the UK deemed as a third country, companies would eventually have to adjust their records of processing activities pursuant to Art. 30 GDPR.

It is recommended that in particular those companies transferring a lot of personal data to the UK at least are aware of these potentially required adaptations in order to further ensure compliance with EU data protection laws. As the GDPR, principally does not privilege any group of companies, the aforementioned recommendation also apply to data flows within such groups.

United Kingdom become a third country after Brexit

29. January 2018

Withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the Union and EU leads to United Kingdom become a third country.

The European Commission annouced, that on 30.03.2019, 00:00h (CET) the United Kingdom will no longer be member of the Union and EU, all Union and secondary law will cease to apply.

That means, tat all stakeholders processing personal data need to consider the legal repercussions of Brexit, beacuse as of the withdrawal date, the EU rules for transfer personal data to third countries apply. GDPR allows a transfer if the controller or processor provides appropriate safeguards.

Safeguards may be provided by:

  • Sandarad data protection clauses (SCC)
  • Binding corporate rules (BCR)
    • legally binding data protection rules approved by the competent data protection authority which apply within a corporate group
  • Condes of Conduct
    • Approved Codes of Conduct together with binding and enforceable commitments of the controller or processor in the third country
  • Certification mechanisms
    • Approved certification mechanisms together with binding and enforceable commitments of the controller or processor in the third country

Besides a transfer may take place based on consent, for the performance of a contract, for exercise of legal claims or for important reasons of public interest.

These procedures are already well-known to business operators beacuse they are uses today for the transfer of personal data to non EU-countries like the USA, Russia or China.

The decision is disappointing for everyone who were hoping for an adequate level of data protection in the United Kingdom.

Stakeholders should prepare for the requirements associated with recognition as a third country.

Category: EU Commission · European Union · GDPR · UK
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Data Protection in the UK after the “Brexit”

4. April 2017

After the Brexit, keeping data by the UK companies and organizations is expected to become more certain locally than globally.

Elizabeth Denham, the UK’s Information Commissioner, recently commented before the House of Lords EU Home Affairs Sub-Committee, that the UK should apply to the European Commission for a full “adequacy” decision in terms of proving the adequate data protection measures as UK will become soon a non-EU country.

British government comments on the free trade deal with these words: “no deal for the UK is better than a bad deal for the UK”.

In the context of Brexit, it is crucial for the industry of the UK to keep the data-flows unhindered though.

British politician David Davis indicates that the UK and EU are now on their way to find and maintain equivalence (and not identity) in their relations (especially when it comes to business) in order to keep up their common interest.

Even though Davis is not using the “adequacy” term in his speech, this is what the UK technology industry is asking for.

Government assures that if no accord in that matter will be reached, there are still many alternatives to adequacy.

Category: UK
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