Tag: sensitive data

Dutch data scandal: illegal trade of COVID-19 patient data

19. February 2021

In recent months, a RTL Nieuws reporter Daniël Verlaan has discovered widespread trade in the personal data of Dutch COVID-19 test subjects. He found ads consisting of photos of computer screens listing data of Dutch citizens. Apparently, the data had been offered for sale on various instant messaging apps such as Telegram, Snapchat and Wickr. The prices ranged from €30 to €50 per person. The data included home addresses, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth and BSN identifiers (Dutch social security number).

The personal data were registered in the two main IT systems of the Dutch Municipal Health Service (GGD) – CoronIT, containing details about citizens who took a COVID-19 test, and HPzone Light, a contact-tracing system, which contains the personal data of people infected with the coronavirus.

After becoming aware of the illegal trade, the GGD reported it to the Dutch Data Protection Authority and the police. The cybercrime team of the Midden-Nederland police immediately started an investigation. It showed that at least two GGD employees had maliciously stolen the data, as they had access to the official Dutch government COVID-19 systems and databases. Within 24 hours of the complaint, two men were arrested. Several days later, a third suspect was tracked down as well. The investigation continues, since the extent of the data theft is unclear and whether the suspects in fact managed to sell the data. Therefore, more arrests are certainly not excluded.

Chair of the Dutch Institute for Vulnerability Disclosure, Victor Gevers, told ZDNet in an interview:

Because people are working from home, they can easily take photos of their screens. This is one of the issues when your administrative staff is working from home.

Many people expressed their disapproval of the insufficient security measures concerning the COVID-19 systems. Since the databases include very sensitive data, the government has a duty to protect these properly in order to prevent criminal misuse. People must be able to rely on their personal data being treated confidentially.

In a press release, the Dutch police also raised awareness of the cybercrime risks, like scam or identity fraud. Moreover, they informed about the possibilities of protection against such crimes and the need to report them. This prevents victims and allows the police to immediately track down suspects and stop their criminal practices.

California Voters approve new Privacy Legislation CPRA

20. November 2020

On November 3rd 2020, Californian citizens were able to vote on the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (“CPRA”) in a state ballot (we reported). As polls leading up to the vote already suggested, California voters approved the new Privacy legislation, also known as “Prop 24”. The CPRA was passed with 56.2% of Yes Votes to 43.8% of No Votes. Most provisions of the CPRA will enter into force on 1 January 2021 and will become applicable to businesses on 1 January 2023. It will, at large, only apply to information collected from 1 January 2022.

The CPRA will complement and expand privacy rights of California citizens considerably. Among others, the amendments will include:

  • Broadening the term “sale” of personal information to “sale or share” of private information,
  • Adding new requirements to qualify as a “service provider” and defining the term “contractor” anew,
  • Defining the term “consent”,
  • Introducing the category of “Sensitive Information”, including a consumer’s Right to limit the use of “Sensitive Information”,
  • Introducing the concept of “Profiling” and granting consumers the Right to Opt-out of the use of the personal information for Automated Decision-Making,
  • Granting consumers the Right to correct inaccurate information,
  • Granting consumers the Right to Data Portability, and
  • Establishing the California Privacy Protection Agency (CalPPA) with a broad scope of responsibilities and enforcement powers.

Ensuring compliance with the CPRA will require proper preparation. Affected businesses will have to review existing processes or implement new processes in order to guarantee the newly added consumer rights, meet the contractual requirements with service providers/contractors, and show compliance with the new legislation as a whole.

In an interview after the passage of the CPRA, the initiator of the CCPA and the CPRA Alastair Mactaggard commented that

Privacy legislation is here to stay.

He hopes that California Privacy legislation will be a model for other states or even the U.S. Congress to follow, in order to offer consumers in other parts of the country the same Privacy rights as there are in California now.

Germany: Large Data leak reveals Personal Data of more than 3 Million Customers

27. January 2020

The German car rental company Buchbinder is responsible for leaking Personal Data of more than 3 Million customers from all over Europe. The data leak exposed more than 10 Terabyte of sensitive customer data over several weeks without the company noticing it.

A German cybersecurity firm was executing routine network scans when it found the data leak. The firm reported it twice to Buchbinder via e-mail, but did not receive a reply. After that, the cybersecurity firm reported the leak to the Bavarian Data Protection Authority (DPA) and informed the German computer magazine c’t and newspaper DIE ZEIT.

According to c’t, a configuration error of a Backup-Server was the cause of the leak. The Personal Data exposed included customers’ names, private addresses, birth dates, telephone numbers, rental data, bank details, accident reports, legal documents, as well as Buchbinder employees’ e-mails and access data to internal networks.

The data leak is particularly serious because of the vast amount of leaked Personal Data that could easily be abused through Spam e-mails, Fraud, Phishing, or Identity theft. It is therefore likely that the German DPA will impose a GDPR fine on the company in the future.

Buchbinder released a press statement apologising for the data leak and promising to enhance the level of their defense and cybersecurity system.

Massive data breach in Sweden: Millions of Health Hotline Calls exposed online

22. February 2019

Recently around 2.7 million sensitive phone calls were uncovered by Swedish technology news site Computer Sweden. In total, 170,000 hours of conversation were available online on an unencrypted web server. The server had no login mechanism so the recorded calls could be accessed freely.

Sweden operates a national health advice line (1177), which is run by Swedish company Medhelp. For out-of-hour calls they subcontract with a Thailand-based firm called Medicall. According to repords, most of the uncovered calls were made outside the regular times and therefore answered by Medicall. A request from the BBC left Medicall unanswered.

The uncovered data is extremely private as People usually call 1177 seeking medical advice, talking about their symptoms, their kids’ illnesses and giving out their social security number.
The Swedish Data Protection Authority is currently investigating the case.

France: Intelligence agency officer caught selling sensitive police data

9. October 2018

A massive case of misuse of confidential data from security authority surveillance systems has been uncovered in France. After the French customs tracked down an illegal marketplace called “Black Hand” in June, the investigators also found data that was sold by an anonymous user called “Haurus”. Haurus sold for example confidential documents and information from national police databases.

Meanwhile the investigators gleaned the identity of the hacker with the help of specific codes attached to the data. According to French newspaper “Le Parisien”, Haurus is an officer at the “Direction générale de la sécurité intérieure” (DGSI), a French intelligence agency. The DGSI is normally in charge of counter-terrorism, countering cyber-crime and surveillance of potentially threatening groups and organisations.

According to the reports, the agent offered services in exchange for bitcoin. For example, he advertised to track the location of buyer’s gang rivals or spouses based on the telephone number or he offered to tell them, if the French police tracked them. The investigators believe that he used the resources, which the French police uses to track criminals.

Haurus was arrested at the end of September and faces up to seven years in prison and a fine up to 100.000€.

Category: Cyber security · EU
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