Category: General

Apple wants to evaluate “Siri”-recordings again

14. October 2019

Apple wants to evaluate Siri-recordings again in the future. After it became public that Apple automatically saved the audio recordings of Siri entries and had some of them evaluated by employees of external companies, the company stopped this procedure. Although Apple stated that only less than 0.2 % of the queries were actually evaluated, the system received around 10 billion queries per month (as of 2018).

In the future, audio recordings from the Siri language assistant will be stored and evaluated again. This time, however, only after the user has consented. This procedure will be tested with the latest beta versions of the Apple IOS software for iPhone and iPad.

Apple itself hopes that many users will agree and thus contribute to the improvement of Siri. A later opt-out is possible at any time, but for each device individually. In addition, only apple’s own employees, who are – according to Apple -subject to strict confidentiality obligations ,will evaluate the recordings. Recordings that have been generated by an unintentional activation of Siri will be completely deleted.

In addition, a delete function for Siri-recordings is to be introduced. Users can then choose in their settings to delete all data recorded by Siri. If this deletion is requested within 24 hours of a Siri request, the respective recordings and transcripts will not be released for evaluation.

However, even if the user does not opt-in to the evaluation of his Siri recordings, a computer-generated transcript will continue to be created and kept by Apple for a certain period of time. Although these transcripts are to be anonymized and linked to a random ID, they still could be evaluated according to Apple.

Category: General
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USA and UK sign Cross Border Data Access Agreement for Criminal Electronic Data

10. October 2019

The United States and the United Kingdom have entered into the first of its kind CLOUD Act Data Access Agreement, which will allow both countries’ law enforcement authorities to demand authorized access to electronic data relating to serious crime. In both cases, the respective authorities are permitted to ask the tech companies based in the other country, for electronic data directly and without legal barriers.

At the base of this bilateral Agreement stands the U.S.A.’s Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data Act (CLOUD Act), which came into effect in March 2018. It aims to improve procedures for U.S. and foreign investigators for obtaining electronic information held by service providers in the other country. In light of the growing number of mutual legal assistance requests for electronic data from U.S. service providers, the current process for access may take up to two years. The Data Access Agreement can reduce that time considerably by allowing for a more efficient and effective access to data needed, while protecting the privacy and civil liberties of the data subjects.

The Cloud Act focuses on updating legal frameworks to respond to the growing technology in electronic communications and service systems. It further enables the U.S. and other countries to enter into a mutual executive Agreement in order to use own legal authorities to access electronic evidence in the other respective country. An Agreement of this form can only be signed by rights-respecting countries, after it has been certified by the U.S. Attorney General to the U.S. Congress that their laws have robust substansive and procedural protections for privacy and civil liberties.

The Agreement between the U.K. and the U.S.A. further assures providers that the requested disclosures are compatible with data protection laws in both respective countries.

In addition to the Agreement with the United Kingdom, there have been talks between the United States and Australia on Monday, reporting negotiations for such an Agreement between the two countries. Other negotiations have also been held between the U.S. and the European Commission, representing the European Union, in regards to a Data Access Agreement.

Category: General · UK · USA
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Belgian DPA announces GDPR fine

7. October 2019

The Belgian data protection authority (Gegevensbeschermingsautoriteit) has recently imposed a fine of €10,000 for violating the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The case concerns a Belgian shop that provided the data subject with only one opportunity to get a customer card, namely the  electronic identity card (eID). The eID is a national identification card, which contains several information about the cardholder, so the authority considers that the use of this information without the valid consent of the customer is disproportionate to the service offered.

The Authority had learnt of the case following a complaint from a customer. He was denied a customer card because he did not want to provide his electronic identity card. Instead, he had offered the shop to send his data in writing.

According to the Belgian data protection authority, this action violates the GDPR in several respects. On the one hand, the principle of data minimisation is not respected. This requires that the duration and the quantity of the processed data are limited by the controller to the extent absolutely necessary for the pursued purpose.

In order to create the customer card, the controller has access to all the data stored on the eID, including name, address, a photograph and the barcode associated with the national registration number. The Authority therefore believes that the use of all eID data is disproportionate to the creation of a customer card.

The DPA also considers that there is no valid consent as a legal basis. According to the GDPR, the consent must be freely given, specific and informed. However, there is no voluntary consent in this case, since no other alternative is offered to the customer. If a customer refuses to use his electronic ID card, he will not receive a customer card and will therefore not be able to benefit from the shops’ discounts and advantages.

In view of these violations, the authority has imposed a fine of €10,000.

Category: Belgian DPA · Belgium · GDPR · General
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CJEU rules that Right To Be Forgotten is only applicable in Europe

27. September 2019

In a landmark case on Tuesday the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ruled that Google will not have to apply the General Data Privacy Regulation’s (GDPR) “Right to be Forgotten” to its search engines outside of the European Union. The ruling is a victory for Google in a case against a fine imposed by the french Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertés (CNIL) in 2015 in an effort to force the company and other search engines to take down links globally.

Seeing as the internet has grown into a worldwide media net with no borders, this case is viewed as a test of wether people can demand a blanket removal of information about themselves from searches without overbearing on the principles of free speech and public interest. Around the world, it has also been perceived as a trial to see if the European Union can extend its laws beyond its own borders.

“The balance between right to privacy and protection of personal data, on the one hand, and the freedom of information of internet users, on the other, is likely to vary significantly around the world,” the court stated in its decision.The Court also expressed in the judgement that the protection of personal data is not an absolute right.

While this leads to companies not being forced to delete sensitive information on their search engines outside of the EU upon request, they must take precautions to seriously discourage internet users from going onto non-EU versions of their pages. Furthermore, companies with search engines within the EU will have to closely weigh freedom of speech against the protection of privacy, keeping the currently common case to case basis for deletion requests.

In effect, since the Right to be Forgotten had been first determined by the CJEU in 2014, Google has since received over 3,3 million deletion requests. In 45% of the cases it has complied with the delisting of links from its search engine. As it stands, even while complying with deletion requests, the delisted links within the EU search engines can still be accessed by using VPN and gaining access to non-EU search engines, circumventing the geoblocking. This is an issue to which a solution has not yet been found.

Data Breach: Millions of patient data available on the Internet

20. September 2019

As reported by the US investment platform ProPublica and the German broadcaster Bayerischer Rundfunk, millions of highly sensitive patient data were discovered freely accessible on the Internet.

Among the data sets are high-resolution X-ray images, breast cancer screenings, CT scans and other medical images. Most of them are provided with personal data such as birth dates, names and information about their doctor and their medical treatment. The data could be found for years on unprotected servers.

In Germany, around 13,000 data records are affected, and more than 16 million worldwide, including more than 5 million patients in the USA.

When X-ray or MRI images of patients are taken, they are stored on “Picture Archiving Communication System” (PACS) servers. If these servers are not sufficiently secured, it is easy to access the data. In 2016, Oleg Pianykh, Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School, published a study on unsecured PACS servers. He was able to locate more than 2700 open systems, but the study did not prompt anyone in the industry to act.

The German Federal Ministry for Information Security has now informed authorities in 46 countries. Now it remains to be seen how they will react to the incident.

Ecuadorian Data Breach reveals Data of over 20 Million People

19. September 2019

On Monday, 16th of September, it has been revealed that the detailed information of potencially every citizen of Ecuador has been freely available online as part of a massive data breach resulting from an incorrectly configured database. The leak, detected by security researchers of vpnMentor during a routine large-scale web mapping project, exposed more than 20 million individuals, inclusing close to 7 million children, giving access to 18 GB of data.

In effect Ecuador counts close to 17 million citizens, making it possible that almost every citizen has had some data compromised. This also includes government officials, high profile persons like Julian Assange, and the Ecuadorian President.

In their report, vpnMentor designates that it was able to track the server back to its owner, an ecuadorian company named Novaestrat, which is a consulting company providing services in data analytics, strategic marketing and software development.

It also mentioned several examples of the entries it had found in the database, including the types of data that were leaked. Those came down to full names, gender and birth information, home and e-mail adresses, telephone numbers, financial information, family members and employment information.

Access to the data has been cut off by the ecuadorian Computer Emergency Response Team, but the highly private and sensitive nature of the leaked information could create long lasting privacy issues for the citizens of the country.

In a twitter post, Telecommunications Minister Andres Michelena announced that the data protection bill, which had been in the works for months, will be submitted to the National Assembly within 72 hours. On top of that, an investigation into the possibility of a violation of personal privacy by Novaestrat has been opened.

London’s King’s Cross station facial recognition technology under investigation by the ICO

11. September 2019

Initially reported by the Financial Times, London’s King’s Cross station is under crossfire for making use of a live face-scanning system across its 67 acres large site. Developed by Argent, it was confirmed that the system has been used to ensure public safety, being part of a number of detection and tracking methods used in terms of surveillance at the famous train station. While the site is privately owned, it is widely used by the public and houses various shops, cafes, restaurants, as well as office spaces with tenants like, for example, Google.

The controversy behind the technology and its legality stems from the fact that it records everyone in its parameters without their consent, analyzing their faces and compairing them to a database of wanted criminals, suspects and persons of interest. While Developer Argent defended the technology, it has not yet explained what the system is, how it is used and how long it has been in place.

A day before the ICO launched its investigation, a letter from King’s Cross Chief Executive Robert Evans reached Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, explaining the matching of the technology against a watchlist of flagged individuals. In effect, if footage is unmatched, it is blurred out and deleted. In case of a match, it is only shared with law enforcement. The Metropolitan Police Service has stated that they have supplied images for a database to carry out facial scans to system, though it claims to not have done so since March, 2018.

Despite the explanation and the distinct statements that the software is abiding by England’s data protection laws, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has launched an investigation into the technology and its use in the private sector. Businesses would need to explicitly demonstrate that the use of such surveillance technology is strictly necessary and proportionate for their legitimate interests and public safety. In her statement, Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham further said that she is deeply concerned, since “scanning people’s faces as they lawfully go about their daily lives, in order to identify them, is a potential threat to privacy that should concern us all,” especially if its being done without their knowledge.

The controversy has sparked a demand for a law about facial recognition, igniting a dialogue about new technologies and future-proofing against the yet unknown privacy issues they may cause.

Category: GDPR · General · UK
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Portugal’s new data protection law

3. September 2019

Portugal’s new data protection law “Lei de Execução do Regulamento Geral sobre a Proteção de Dados” was finally published and entered into force last month, following its approval in June. This makes Portugal one of the last EU states to implement the GDPR regulations in national law. The new law regulates among other things the following points:

Consent:

Persons aged 13 and over can give effective consent. In an employment relationship, an employee’s consent is considered a legitimate legal basis only if it leads to a legal or economic advantage for the employee or if it is necessary to fulfil a contract.

Data Protection Officer:

In addition to the tasks defined in the GDPR, the Data Protection Officer in Portugal must ensure that audits are carried out, that Controllers are aware of the importance of early detection of data protection incidents and the relations with the Data Subjects regarding data protection.

Video surveillance:

The law stipulates that in some areas, such as bathrooms or changing rooms, video surveillance is prohibited. ATMs may also only be filmed in such a way that the customer’s keyboard and the associated PIN entry cannot be seen.

Retention periods:

If no retention period is specified, the duration necessary to achieve the purpose shall be decisive. However, the right to be forgotten can only be exercised at the end of the retention period. In contrast to the GDPR the Portuguese data protection law permits a storage of certain dates for always. This applies only to data about the social security amounts for the retirement if suitable technical and organizational measures are taken.

Invitation to datenschutzticker.live on October 30th 2019 in Cologne

30. August 2019

The entry into force of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was a milestone in data protection law and attracted worldwide attention. In the daily business, interpretation issues continue to determine the work of all responsible persons for data protection. Since 8 years datenschutzticker.de, the blog of KINAST Attorneys at Law, has been reporting on practical questions regarding data protection. After approximately 2.000 blog posts and countless feedback from the readership, datenschutzticker.de is now going live.

 

We cordially invite you to this event!

 

datenschutzticker.live offers a platform for exchange between authorities and companies. We are pleased to have the Federal Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information, Prof. Ulrich Kelber, as well as the State Data Protection Commissioner for Hesse, Prof. Michael Ronellenfitsch and Saxony-Anhalt, Dr. Harald von Bose, as speakers for our event. Top-class speakers from the corporate side will also give lectures on data protection issues from their corporate practice.

Register today for datenschutzticker.live. The event will be in German language and take place all day on Wednesday, 30th October 2019 in the Wolkenburg in Cologne (city centre, near the main railway station). datenschutzticker.live is open to everyone and the participation is free of charge and including catering.

Due to the limitation of capacities we ask you to register by email at veranstaltung@datenschutzticker.live , stating your name and, if you are not coming as a private participant, your organisation. We look forward to meeting you live!

Your team from
datenschutzticker.live

Greek Parliament passes bill to adopt GDPR into National Law

29. August 2019

On Monday, August 26th, the Greek Parliament passed a bill that will incorporate the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) into national law. Originally, the adaptation of the EU regulation was supposed to take place until May 06, 2018. Greece failed to comply with the deadline.

The, now, fast-paced implementation of the regulation may have come as a result of the referral of Greece and Spain by the European Commission (EC) to the European Court of Justice on July 25th. Since they had failed to adopt the GDPR into national law up until then, Greece could have faced a fine of €5,287.50 for every day passed since May 06, in addition to a stiff fine of €1.3 million. In its statement, the EC declared that “the lack of transposition by Spain and Greece creates a different level of protection of peoples’ rights and freedoms, and hampers data exchanges between Greece and Spain on one side and other Member States, who transposed the Directive, on the other side”.

The EU countries are allowed to adopt certain derogations, exeptions and specifications under the GDPR. Greece has done so, in the approved bill, with adjusted provisions in regards to the age of consent, the process of appointing a Data Protection Officer, sensitive data processing, data repurposing, data deletion, certifications and criminal sanctions.

The legislation was approved by New Democracy, the main opposition SYRIZA, the center-left Movement for Change and leftist MeRA25, with an overwhelming majority. The GDPR has already been in effect since May 25th, 2018, with its main aim being to offer more control to individuals over their personal data that they provide to companies and services.

 

Category: EU · EU Commission · GDPR · General
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