Tag: Data breach notification

Irish DPC releases guide on Data Breach Notifications

15. August 2019

On Monday the Irish Data Protection Commission (IDPC) has released a quick guide on Data Breach Notifications. It is supposed to help controllers understand their obligations regarding notification and communication requirements, both to the responsible DPC and to the data subject.

The guide, which is supposed to be a quick overview of the requirements and obligations which fall on data controllers, refers to the Article 29 Working Party’s (now European Data Protection Board or EDPB), much more in depth and detailed, guidance in their guideline concerning Data Breach Notifications.

In summary, the IDPC categorizes a Data Breach as a “security incident that negatively impacts the confidentiality, integrity or availability of personal data; meaning that the controller is unable to ensure compliance with the principles relating to the processing of personal data as outlined in Art. 5 GDPR”. In this case, it falls to the controller to follow two primary obligations: (1) to notify the responsible DPC of the data breach, unless it is unlikely to result in a risk for the data subject, and (2) to communicate the data breach to the affected data subjects, when it is likely to result in a high risk.

The IDPC seeks to help controllers by providing a list of requirements in cases of notification to the DPC and data subjects, especially given the tight timeframe for notifications to be filed within 72 hours of awareness of the breach. It is hoping to eliminate confusion arising in the process, as well as problems that companies have had while filing a Data Breach Notification in the past.

The new Dutch data breach notification obligation: 1.500 notifications in 2016

17. May 2016

From the 1st January 2016, data controllers located in The Netherlands are obliged to notify serious data breaches according to the Amendment made to Art. 34 of the current Dutch Data Protection Act. This obligation implies:

  • Notifying the Dutch DPA in the cases where there is a considerable probability that the breach hast serious adverse effects on the privacy if the affected individuals; and
  • Notifying the data subjects affected if there is a considerable probability that the privacy of the data subject is negatively affected.

According to a representative of the Dutch DPA, already 1.500 data breach notifications have been received since the new rule entered into force. This is not surprising for the Dutch DPA, as currently more than 130.000 organizations located in the Netherlands are subject to the data breach notification obligation. However, the Dutch DPA suspects that the number of occurred data breaches is actually higher.

In order to review the notifications, the Dutch DPA has implemented a software that separates the notifications that require action from the DPA from those that do not require additional action. The ones that do not require additional action are archived for future references, while the formers are further examined by the Dutch DPA. Nevertheless, the DPA has examined all received notifications, in order to identify the main sources of data breaches, which result to be based on one of the following reasons:

  • Loss of devices that were not encrypted; or
  • Disposal of information without observing adequate security measures, such as the use of a shredder or the disposal in locked containers; or
  • Insecure transfer of information, especially related to sensitive data; or
  • The access by unauthorized third parties to data bases and personal data.

This shows that most of data breaches occur because organizations do not implement adequate technical and organizational security measures or they do not follow the existing obligations regarding IT security and data protection, or employees are not trained in theses aspects.

Moreover, two-thirds of the reports were subject to a further investigation by the Dutch DPA and actions have been already taken against around 70 organizations. Also, in some cases additional information was required from the organization or the individuals had to be notified about the data breach. Information to data subjects is required if sensitive personal data is affected by the breach, the Dutch DPA has enumerated some of the data categories that are included in the definition of sensitive personal data: financial information, data that may lead to an stigmatization or exclusion of the data subject, user names, passwords or data that can be misused for identity fraud.

The new GDPR also regulates the obligation to notify data breaches. According to the Regulation, the DPA should be always notified, unless it is unlikely that the breach results in a risk for the privacy of data subjects. Furthermore, data subjects should be directly notified if the breach could result in a high risk for their privacy, so that the regulation of data breaches in the GDPR is stricter than that in The Netherlands regarding the notification to data subjects.