Apple bows to Chinese government

5. March 2018

Apple backs down: The Chinese government has demanded that Apple no longer outsource control of Chinese users data to US-based servers, but hand them over to a Chinese company.

This is likely to give Chinese authorities access to the personal data of Chinese users.

Apple informed the users in the passed weeks. Users of Apples service iCloud were informed, that their data is not longer stored on servers in the USA. Since February 28th, is Guizhou-Cloud Big Data (GCBD) the server provider for the data of Chinese users. GCBD is a state-controlled internet company based in Guizhou Province in southern China.

Affected are iCloud users with a Chinese Apple-ID.

The measure is based on new Chinese cybersecurity law, that is in place since last year. According to the new law, personal data of Chinese users fall under Chinese law and not, like before, under the law, the provider falls under.

For the diffraction under the Chinese law, Apple is heavily criticized.

 

 

United States vs. Microsoft

28. February 2018

The United States Supreme Court (SCOTUS) heared yesterday the arguments in the case United States vs. Microsoft.

The dispute betwenn the US government and Microsoft has spanned several years, since 2013, and has major implications for the privacy profession.

Issue is, that the U.S. can compel Microsoft to turn over data stored on a server outside the United States. Basis of the the obligation is a warrant issued by a US court under the Stored Communications Act. Microsoft should turn over emails of a customer stored on Microsoft servers, both in the US and in Ireland. Microsoft handed out the data stored in the US, but reject to turn over the data stored in Ireland. Basis for the rejection is, according to the position of Microsoft, that a Irish court is responsible and not a US court, due to the Stored Communications Act cannot reach outside of the territorial jurisdiction of the US. The US position, adopted by the magistrate judge and district court is, that because Microsoft is a US company, and fully capable of accessing the information described in the warrant, the warrant is a valid exercise of wholly domestic power.

A judgement could be made in June.

The European Data Protection Board – A new authority under the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

27. February 2018

Through the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) there will be established a new EU Data Protection Authority, the so-called European Data Protection Board (the “Board”). The Board replaces the Article 29 Working Party starting May 25th 2018, when the GDPR enters into force. The board has its own legal personality.

Pursuant to Art. 68 (3) GDPR the Board is composed of the head of one supervisory authority of each Member State and of the European Data Protection Supervisor. It works independent and on its own initiative by issuing its opinion pursuant to Art. 64 GDPR or adopting a binding decision pursuant to Art. 65 GDPR, especially in the written cases of Art. 65 (1) GDPR. The Board hence has the authority to adopt one of the most powerful legal acts of the union from Art. 288 of the Treaty of the European Union (TFEU).

While harmonizing the data protection in the EU, the Boards main task is to maintain the consistent application of the GDPR by the national supervisory authority through the Consistency mechanism pursuant to Art. 63 GDPR. Within this Consistency mechanism, the Board comments the so-called Binding Corporate Rules (BCR), which are necessarily given by national data protection authorities for international data transfer of a company group.

The Board also has the final say if the national data protection authorities cannot reach an agreement concerning the implementation of the GDPR.

United Kingdom become a third country after Brexit

29. January 2018

Withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the Union and EU leads to United Kingdom become a third country.

The European Commission annouced, that on 30.03.2019, 00:00h (CET) the United Kingdom will no longer be member of the Union and EU, all Union and secondary law will cease to apply.

That means, tat all stakeholders processing personal data need to consider the legal repercussions of Brexit, beacuse as of the withdrawal date, the EU rules for transfer personal data to third countries apply. GDPR allows a transfer if the controller or processor provides appropriate safeguards.

Safeguards may be provided by:

  • Sandarad data protection clauses (SCC)
  • Binding corporate rules (BCR)
    • legally binding data protection rules approved by the competent data protection authority which apply within a corporate group
  • Condes of Conduct
    • Approved Codes of Conduct together with binding and enforceable commitments of the controller or processor in the third country
  • Certification mechanisms
    • Approved certification mechanisms together with binding and enforceable commitments of the controller or processor in the third country

Besides a transfer may take place based on consent, for the performance of a contract, for exercise of legal claims or for important reasons of public interest.

These procedures are already well-known to business operators beacuse they are uses today for the transfer of personal data to non EU-countries like the USA, Russia or China.

The decision is disappointing for everyone who were hoping for an adequate level of data protection in the United Kingdom.

Stakeholders should prepare for the requirements associated with recognition as a third country.

Category: EU Commission · European Union · GDPR · UK
Tags:

WP29 Guidelines on the notion of consent according to the GDPR – Part 1

26. January 2018

According to the GDPR, consent is one of the six lawful bases mentioned in Art. 6. In order for consent to be valid and compliant with the GDPR it needs to reflect the data subjects real choice and control.

The Working Party 29 (WP 29) clarifies and specifies the “requirements for obtaining and demonstrating” such a valid consent in its Guidelines released in December 2017.

The guidelines start off with an analysis of Article 4 (11) of the GDPR and then discusses the elements of valid consent. Referring to the Opinion 15/2011 on the definition of consent, “obtaining consent also does not negate or in any way diminish the controller’s obligations to observe the principles of processing enshrined in the GDPR, especially Article 5 of the GDPR with regard to fairness, necessity and proportionality, as well as data quality.”

The WP29 illustrates the elements of valid consent, such as the consent being freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous. For example, a consent is not considered as freely given if a mobile app for photo editing requires the users to have their GPS location activated simply in order to collect behavioural data aside from the photo editing. The WP29 emphasizes that consent to processing of unnecessary personal data “cannot be seen as a mandatory consideration in exchange for performance.”

Another important aspect taken into consideration is the imbalance of powers, e.g. in the matter of public authorities or in the context of employment. “Consent can only be valid if the data subject is able to exercise a real choice, and there is no risk of deception, intimidation, coercion or significant negative consequences (e.g. substantial extra costs) if he/she does not consent. Consent will not be free in cases where there is any element of compulsion, pressure or inability to exercise free will. “

Art. 7(4) GDPR emphasizes that the performance of a contract is not supposed to be conditional on consent to the processing of personal data that is not necessary for the performance of the contract. The WP 29 states that “compulsion to agree with the use of personal data additional to what is strictly necessary limits data subject’s choices and stands in the way of free consent.” Depending on the scope of the contract or service, the term “necessary for the performance of a contract… …needs to be interpreted strictly”. The WP29 lays down examples of cases where the bundling of situations is acceptable.

If a service involves multiple processing operations or multiple purposes, the data subject should have the freedom to choose which purpose they accept. This concept of granularity requires the purposes to be separated and consent to be obtained for each purpose.

Withdrawal of consent has to be possible without any detriment, e.g. in terms of additional costs or downgrade of services. Any other negative consequence such as deception, intimidation or coercion is also considered to be invalidating. The WP29 therefore suggests controllers to ensure proof that consent has been given accordingly.

(will be soon continued in Part 2)

Will Visa Applicants for the USA have to reveal their Social Media Identities in future?

11. January 2018

The U.S. Department of State is aiming for Visa applicants to answer supplemental questions, including information about social media. A 30-Day notice has been published in November in order to gather opinions from all interested individuals and organizations. The goal is to establish a legal basis for the “proper collection of all information necessary to rigorously evaluate all grounds of inadmissibility or deportability, or grounds for the denial of other immigration benefits”.

In concrete terms, applicants are supposed to reveal their social media identifiers used during the last five years. The State Department stresses the fact that “the collection of social media platforms and identifiers will not be used to deny visas based on applicants’ race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, political views, gender, or sexual orientation.”

Meanwhile, the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) has submitted its comments asking for withdrawal of the proposal to collect social media identifiers and for review of the appropriateness of using social media to make visa determinations.

EPIC not only critizes the lack of transparency as it is “not clear how the State Department intends to use the social media identifiers” and further continues that “the benefits for national security” don’t seem precise. The organization also expresses concerns because the collection of these data enable enhanced profiling and tracking of individuals as well as large scale surveillance of innocent people, maybe even leading to secret profiles.

It remains to be seen how the situation develops and how the public opinion influences the outcome.

Risk of identity theft for a billion people in India

5. January 2018

A billion people in India may be victims of identity theft. The Tribune newspaper uncovered a security breach in the country’s vast biometric database. The database contains personal data of almost every citizen in India. The biometric ID program called Aadhaar is a flagship policy of Prime Minister Narendra Modi against corruption.
The reporters of the newspaper were able to access names, email addresses, phone numbers and postal codes by typing in 12-digit unique identification numbers of people in the government’s database, after paying about 6,50 € ($8, 500 rupees).
The seller also sold software to print out unique identification cards, called Aadhaar cards that can be used to access various government services.
The seller had gained access to the database through former workers who were initially tasked with making the Aadhaar cards.
India’s Unique Identification Authority said in an official statement “Claims of bypassing or duping the Aadhaar enrollment system are totally unfounded. Aadhaar data is fully safe and secure and has robust, uncompromised security.” The governing Party officially tweeted that the report was fake news.

Happy New Year!

1. January 2018

Dear readers,

the team of the blog privacy-ticker.com wish you a happy new year and all the best for 2018.

Once again this year we will keep you up to date on the subject of data protection.

Best regards,

privacy-ticker.com

Category: General

Indian government urges people to sign up to Aadhaar – the world’s largest biometric ID system – while the Supreme Court still needs to determine its legality

28. December 2017

As reported in August of this year, the Indian Supreme Court (SC) acknowledged that the right to privacy is “intrinsic to life and liberty” and is “inherently protected under the various fundamental freedoms enshrined under Part III of the Indian Constitution.”

In the same context, the SC had announced it will be hearing petitions on Aadhaar related matters (the term – meaning “foundation” – stands for a 12 digit unique-identity number supposedly issued to all Indian residents based on their biometric and demographic data) in November.

According to a Bloomberg report, India’a Prime Minister Narendra Modi is calling for an expansion of Aadhaar, even though its constitutionality is still to be debated. The SC has set January 10th as the beginning of the final hearings.

While officials say Aadhaar is saving the government billions of dollars by better targeting beneficiaries of subsidized food and cash transfers, critics point to unfair exclusions and data leaks. The latter on the one hand also fear that the database might lead India into becoming a state of surveillance. On the other hand, they are concerned about the high risk of major leaks, such as the ones reported by a news agency in India, the PTI (Press Trust of India): “Personal details of several Aadhaar users were made public on over 200 central and state government websites.”

Meanwhile, Medianama, a source of information and analysis on Digital and Telecom businesses in India, has launched a list of already compromised leaks and encourages people to point out any similar incidents.

Category: Data breach · General · India · Personal Data
Tags: ,

Cancer Care Organization settles for 2.3 Mio $ after Data Breach

22. December 2017

In 2015, a data breach occurred at 21st Century Oncology  (21stCO), one of the leading providers of cancer care services in the USA, potentially affecting names, social security numbers, medical diagnoses and health insurance information of at least 2.2 million patients.

On its website, the provider had announced in 2016 that one of its databases was inappropriately accessed by an unauthorized third party, though an FBI investigation had already detected an attack as early as October 2015. The FBI, however, requested 21stCO to delay the notification because of ongoing federal investigations.

21stCO had then stated that ““we continue to work closely with the FBI on its investigation of the intrusion into our system” and “in addition to security measures already in place, we have also taken additional steps to enhance internal security protocols to help prevent a similar incident in the future.” To make amends for the security gap patients had been offered one year of free credit monitoring services.

Nevertheless, the provider now has to pay a fine worth 2.3 million dollars as settled with the Office for Civil Rights (OCR; part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services).

It has been accused of not implementing appropriate security measures and procedures to regularly review information system activity such as access or security incident reports, despite the disclosure by the FBI.

The OCR further stated that “the organization also disclosed protected health information to its business associates without having a proper business associate agreement in place”.

The settlement additionally requires 21stCO to set up a corrective action plan including the appointment of a compliance representative, completion of risk analysis and management, revision of cybersecurity policies, an internal breach reporting plan and overall in-depth IT-security. The organization will, in addition, need to maintain all relevant documents and records for six years, so the OCR can inspect and copy the documents if necessary.

Following the settlement, District Attorney Stephen Muldrow stated “we appreciate that 21st Century Oncology self-reported a major fraud affecting Medicare, and we are also pleased that the company has agreed to accept financial responsibility for past compliance failures.”

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