Tag: Amazon

Reuters: U.S. companies ask Trump to support encryption

17. November 2016

This week, Reuters reported that U.S. internet companies, such as Facebook and Amazon have sent a detailied letter including a list of their policiy priorities to President-elect Donald Trump. Among the topics of these policies are encryption, immigration reform and maintaining liability protections from user’s content.

The mentioned letter was sent by the so called Internet Association, which is a group of 40 members, also including Alphabet’s Google, Uber and Twitter. The letter tries to repair the relationship between the internet giants and Trump due to the fact that he was almost universally disliked during the presidential campaign.

The president of the Internet Association, Michael Beckermann signed the letter talking about “The internet industry looks forward to engaging in an open and productive dialogue”. Furthermore, Beckerman issued a statement  syaing that the internet industry looked forward to working closely with Trump and lawmakers in Congress in order to “cement the internet’s role as a driver of economic and social progress for future generations.”

The letter describes some of the policies which go along with Trump’s prior statements, for example easing the regulation on the sharing economy and applying pressure on Europe to not erect too many barriers that restrict U.S. internet companies from growing in that market.

However, other topics are likely to be opposed with Trump’s campaign as he offered numerous broadsides against the tech sector.



Dropbox: new server location in Germany

27. September 2016

Heise online released an article last week talking about a new possibility for Dropbox users, namely to select a German server location.

As already announced, EU citizens are now able to save their data on a server located in Germany. However, this new storage possibility is only available for business use so far. The requirement is that more than 250 employees use Dropbox. Therefore, the new server location is not applicable for private use.

However, Dropbox did not build the new server location on its own. In fact, the infrastucture is provided by Amazon though AWS.


The European Court of Justice ruled on the question which Member State’s data protection laws should apply

29. July 2016

As already published the European Court of Justice had to clarify which Member State’s data protection laws should apply to data processing established within the EU but directed at a number of EU Member States.

Yesterday, the European Court of Justice ruled in the case VKI v. Amazon EU that “ (…) the processing of data (…) is governed by the law of the Member State in whose territory that establishment is situated.”

However, the European Court of Justice did not discuss the respective contract between Amazon and its customers stating that “Luxembourg law shall apply.”

Nevertheless, the European Court of Justice came to the conclusion that “It is for the national court to determine (…) whether Amazon EU carries out the data processing in question in the context of the activities of an establishment situated in a Member State other than Luxembourg.”

Which European DPA is in charge of supervising Amazon?

28. July 2016

In the case Verein für Konsumenteninformation v. Amazon, the Court of Justice of the European Union has to decide which Member State’s data protection law should apply in case goods are sold across national borders but within the EU. In the respective case goods are sold from a German or Luxembourgish website to an Austrian consumer.

This can be seen as one of the more significant data protection cases of 2016. The judgement will be significant due to the fact that the EU is in the process of implementing the new General Data Protection Regulation. As a consequence an European Data Protection Board (EDPB) will be established, which will represent Data Protection Authorities of different Member States. The EDPB will also be responsible for conflicts of jurisdiction. However, this process has been described as a “ (…) hyper bureaucratic procedure that will lead to more complexity and longer procedures.”

In case the Court of Justice of the European Union clarifies the jurisdiction of Data Protection Authorities, there may be less need to utilise these hyper-bureaucratic procedures. This could make the EU’s single market more efficient.

The Court of Justice of the European Union will probably rule on this matter today.