Tag: India

The Government of India plans one of the largest Facial Recognition Systems in the World

14. February 2020

The Indian Government released a Request for Proposal to bidder companies to procure a national Automated Facial Recognition System (AFRS). AFRS companies had time to submit their proposals until the end of January 2020. The plans for an AFRS in India are a new political development amidst the intention to pass the first national Data Protection Bill in Parliament.

The new system is supposed to integrate image databases of public authorities centrally as well as incorporate photographs from newspapers, raids, mugshots and sketches. The recordings from surveillance cameras, public or private video feeds shall then be compared to the centralised databases and help identify criminals, missing persons and dead bodies.

Human rights and privacy groups are pointing to various risks that may come with implementing nationwide AFRS in India, including violations of privacy, arbitrariness, mis-identifications, discriminatory profiling, a lack of technical safeguards, and even creating an Orwellian 1984 dystopia through mass surveillance.

However, many people in India are receiving the news about the plans of the Government with acceptance and approval. They hope that the AFRS will lead to better law enforcement and more security in their everyday lives, as India has a comparably high crime rate and only 144 police officers for every 100.000 citizens, compared to 318 per 100.000 citizens in the EU.

India updates privacy bill

12. December 2019

The new update of the Indian Personal Data Protection Bill is part of India’s broader efforts to tightly control the flow of personal data.

The bill’s latest version enpowers the government to ask companies to provide anonymized personal data, as well as other non-personal data in order to help to deliver governmental services and privacy policies. The draft defines “personal data” as information that can help to identify a person and also has characteristics, traits and any other features of a person’s identity. “Sensitive personal data” also includes financial and biometric data. According to the draft, such “sensitive” data can be transferred outside India for processing, but must be stored locally.

Furthermore, social media platforms will be required to offer a mechanism for users to prove their identities and display a verification sign publicly. Such requirements would raise a host of technical issues for companies such as Facebook and WhatsApp.

As a result, the new bill could affect the way companies process, store and transfer Indian consumers’ data. Therefore, it could cause some difficulties for top technology companies.

India: Is the “right to privacy” a fundamental human right?

4. August 2017

The Indian Supreme Court has to decide if the “right to privacy” should be considered a fundamental human right.

According to the Wire, a bench of nine justices was set up after several petitions that challenged the constitutional validity of India’s Aadhaar scheme, with some petitioners claiming that the biometric authentication system is a violation of the privacy of Indians. The bench examined over the last two weeks the nature of privacy as a right in context of two earlier judgements. Back in 1954 and 1962 these judgements came to the conclusion that the right to privacy was not a fundamental right. Legal experts expect the judgement in the last week of August.

Times of India reports that the Supreme Court outlined a three-tier graded approach to examine the question whether privacy can be considered as a fundamental right. The Bench therefore configures privacy into three zones. As stated by a justice of the Bench, the first zone could be the most intimate zone concerning for example marriage or sexuality. The state should only intrude this zone under “extraordinary circumstances provided it met stringent norms”.

The second zone would be the private zone. This zone could involve personal data like the use of credit card or the income tax declaration. In this zone, “sharing of personal data by an individual will be used only for the purpose for which it is shared by an individual”, it is further said.

The third zone would be the public zone. This zone should require only minimal regulation. However, that should not mean that the individual would lose the right of privacy, but “retain his privacy to body and mind”.