Tag: Google

Newest Google instant messaging app criticized due to lack of end-to-end encryption by default

24. May 2016

Allo, the new instant messaging app from Google, has been presented this week and is expected to be available for users this summer. As many other technological companies, such as WhatsApp, Facebook, or Apple, Google has decided to implement end-to-end encryption in this app. End-to-end encryption ensures privacy in certain messaging and video call apps so that not even authorities have access to the information stored.

However, unlike WhatsApp, Facebook messenger or iMessage, end-to-end encryption in Allo has to be activated by the user by selecting the “incognito” mode, what has been subject to strong criticism. As Google explained, end-to-end encryption is not activated by default in order to be able to connect it with the functionalities of Google Assistant, which provides tailored recommendations to its users according to the data stored in Google apps. This means that queries to Google’s own servers may be necessary. If “incognito” mode is active Google Assistant’s features may not be able to be used.

Morey Haber, Vice-President of technology, at the cybersecurity company BeyondTrust, acknowledges the possibility to combine end-to-end encryption with the artificial intelligence feature, but he admits that in this case it is not possible that the queries to Google Assistant are fully processed.

Google engineer, Thai Duong, has posted in his personal blog about the security and privacy features of the app.

Report: Google denies about 70 to 75 percent of “right to be forgotten” requests

17. May 2016

Two years ago, the Court of Justice of the European Union established the “right to be forgotten”. An organization named Reputation VIP launched a website, forget.me,  that should help consumers in Europe submitting requests to Google and Bing.

Based on the consumer submissions through the site, 130,000 URLs, the company released a new report on the trends of the outcome of the requests of the “right to be forgotten” related to geographic location and success rates of those requests.

The study shows, that with regard to geographical means the top three countries from which requests originate are Germany, the UK and France. In more detail it is to say, that more than half of all requests came from Germany and the UK.

With respect to the success rates of the mentioned requests the report states, that Google denies about 70 percent to 75 percent of them.

Furthermore, the study shows, that Google most frequently denies removal requests concerning professional activity. Whereas the type of request is in 61 % of the cases due to an invasion of privacy.

 

 

Criticism at Google’s ‘right to be forgotten’ position

20. April 2016

The New York Times reports that crisicism is raised among European data protection regulators and politicians on Google’s secretive process for deciding whose “right to be forgotten” cases end with a stricken link and whose do not. The lack of the company’s transparency is not the only concern regarding how a private organization has autonomy in these cases instead of the government. Furthermore, Google has ruled on double the amount of national authorities’ privacy judgments. “If Europe really wanted to regain control over personal data, giving Google this type of power is an odd outcome,” concluded Oxford University’s Luciano Floridi.

The criticism is also raised as a result of a general growing discontent from both European regulators and politicians due to the fact that national data protection agencies sometimes lack the financial, technical and human resources to handle the substantial increase of “right to be forgotten” requests, according to regulatory officials and legal experts.

Category: EU · USA
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The French DPA fines Google

29. March 2016

The French Data Protection Authority (“CNIL”) fines Google for data protection violation. In May 2014, the European Court of Justice had decided, that citizens could request search engines to delist inadequate or irrelevant web search results of themselves; the so-called “right-to-be-forgotten” was born.

The CNIL has now fined the US search engine 100.000 Euros over the right-to-be-forgotten, since Google just delisted web search results regionally, for instance only accross their European websites, such as google.fr and not also on the google.com website. By delisting web search results of a person only regionally, the data subject will practically not be able to exercise her/his right-to-be-forgotten efficiently. Search engines should instead delist search results from all their domains.

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