Tag: GDPR

75.4% of Cloud Apps are not compliant with GDPR

18. July 2016

According to the Netskope Cloud Report from June 2016, almost 75.4% of the cloud apps are not compliant with the GDPR. The main reason for this incompliance is the lack of awareness that most organizations have about the amount of cloud apps being used at the company.

The compliance evaluation was based on eight aspects of the GDPR: geographic requirements, data retention, data privacy, terms of data ownership, data protection, data processing agreement, auditing and certifications.

Compliance with the GDPR involves not only that customers as data controllers implement the provisions of the GDPR accordingly, but also that cloud apps vendors (as data controllers) are also compliant. This compliance requirement of the data processor is one of the new requirements that the GDPR imposes. Data processors are also subject to strict data processing requirements and are liable for breach of their obligations. This way, customers are liable for the use they make of the cloud apps and cloud vendors are liable for inherent security and enterprise-readiness.

The report reveals that the main incompliances relate to the data export requirements after termination of service, to excessively long retention periods and to data ownership terms. Moreover, malware also represents an increasing problem regarding cloud apps.

Upon the entry into force of the GDPR, companies shall be able to

  • Identify existing cloud apps in their organization and analyze the risks involved
  • Identify cloud apps storing sensitive data
  • Adopt measures in order to be compliant according to the eight main aspects mentioned above
  • Identify cyber threats and implement adequate measures to safeguard personal data

The role of the DPOs under the new GDPR: the German reference

7. June 2016

The new GDPR, which will enter into force in May 2018, updates the current European Data Protection legislation. One of the key aspects of the Regulation is the obligation to appoint a Data Protection Officer (DPO) in the following cases:

  • If the processing is carried out by a public authority, except court acting in their judicial capacity
  • If the core activities of the controller or the processor consist of processing operations which according to their nature or scope require regular and systematic monitoring of data subjects on a large scale or
  • If the core activities of the controller or the processor consist of processing on a large scale of sensitive data

Currently, several jurisdictions mention the possibility to appoint a DPO, but Germany is the only EU member State that imposes the obligation to appoint a DPO if more than nine people within an organization handle with personal data. The DPO can be a member of the organization or an external expert.

According to German Data Protection law, DPOs are appointed by the management of the organization but fulfill their duties without being subject to any instructions of the data controller. Moreover, they have the obligation to report the management regarding the compliance status of the organization and, even if they recommendations are not followed, the DPO has fulfilled his/her duty. This DPO culture in Germany means also that not only people with legal backgrounds are DPO; furthermore, the role of the DPO is assumed by persons with different backgrounds, for example by engineers or HR employees that have been given this responsibility.

Thomas Spaeing, CEO of the German Association of Data Protection Officers, remarks the importance that the appointed person knows the processes and organization of the company and that he/her can integrate the legislation with the organizational data processing activities. The DPO should be seen as a person who helps businesses implementing data protection processes in interest of both, the data subjects and the company itself.

The GDPR mentions the possibility to appoint either an external or an internal DPO and describes their position in similar terms to those existing under German Data Protection law. In Germany, this will not mean a greater change in the local legislation, but other countries who do not even currently regulate the institution of the DPO, will have to make any necessary changes to be compliant with the requirements of the GDPR until May 2018.

The new Dutch data breach notification obligation: 1.500 notifications in 2016

17. May 2016

From the 1st January 2016, data controllers located in The Netherlands are obliged to notify serious data breaches according to the Amendment made to Art. 34 of the current Dutch Data Protection Act. This obligation implies:

  • Notifying the Dutch DPA in the cases where there is a considerable probability that the breach hast serious adverse effects on the privacy if the affected individuals; and
  • Notifying the data subjects affected if there is a considerable probability that the privacy of the data subject is negatively affected.

According to a representative of the Dutch DPA, already 1.500 data breach notifications have been received since the new rule entered into force. This is not surprising for the Dutch DPA, as currently more than 130.000 organizations located in the Netherlands are subject to the data breach notification obligation. However, the Dutch DPA suspects that the number of occurred data breaches is actually higher.

In order to review the notifications, the Dutch DPA has implemented a software that separates the notifications that require action from the DPA from those that do not require additional action. The ones that do not require additional action are archived for future references, while the formers are further examined by the Dutch DPA. Nevertheless, the DPA has examined all received notifications, in order to identify the main sources of data breaches, which result to be based on one of the following reasons:

  • Loss of devices that were not encrypted; or
  • Disposal of information without observing adequate security measures, such as the use of a shredder or the disposal in locked containers; or
  • Insecure transfer of information, especially related to sensitive data; or
  • The access by unauthorized third parties to data bases and personal data.

This shows that most of data breaches occur because organizations do not implement adequate technical and organizational security measures or they do not follow the existing obligations regarding IT security and data protection, or employees are not trained in theses aspects.

Moreover, two-thirds of the reports were subject to a further investigation by the Dutch DPA and actions have been already taken against around 70 organizations. Also, in some cases additional information was required from the organization or the individuals had to be notified about the data breach. Information to data subjects is required if sensitive personal data is affected by the breach, the Dutch DPA has enumerated some of the data categories that are included in the definition of sensitive personal data: financial information, data that may lead to an stigmatization or exclusion of the data subject, user names, passwords or data that can be misused for identity fraud.

The new GDPR also regulates the obligation to notify data breaches. According to the Regulation, the DPA should be always notified, unless it is unlikely that the breach results in a risk for the privacy of data subjects. Furthermore, data subjects should be directly notified if the breach could result in a high risk for their privacy, so that the regulation of data breaches in the GDPR is stricter than that in The Netherlands regarding the notification to data subjects.

 

GDPR published in the Official Journal of the EU

9. May 2016

After the EU Parliament voted the final draft of the GDPR on April 14th and the EU Commission signed it, the GDPR was finally published in the Official Journal of the EU on May 4th. The GDPR will harmonize several aspects of data protection in order to achieve a higher data protection level within the EU.

The Regulation will enter into force 20 days after publication in the Official Journal of the EU but will be directly applicable two years after its entry into force, this is ending May 2018. This means that organizations have two years to implement the provisions of the GDPR and be compliant.

About 28,000 data protection officers are requiered to be appointed under the GDPR

20. April 2016

Article 37 of the GDPR states that data controllers and processors of personal information are required to appoint a data protection officer in cace:

(a)  The processing is carried out by a public authority or body (except courts); or

(b)  The controller’s or processor’s “core activities” require “regular and systematic monitoring of data subjects on a large scale” or consist of “processing on a large scale of special categories of data.”

A data protection officer is able to be appointed by a group, public authorities or individual legal entity. Article 39 of the GDPR requires that a data protection officer is “designated on the basis of professional qualities and, in particular, expert knowledge of data protection law and practices”. Compliance, trainings on how to process data according to the law and the communication with the national authorities are part of the task area of a data protection officer.

Therefore, due to the GDPR organizations worldwide have to prepare for a number of new requirements in terms of data collection and processing. One particular requirement is that certain organizations will now have to appoint a data protection officer according to Arcticle 37 of the GDPR, as mentioned above. Research indicates the number of data protection officers required to be appointed under the GDPR will be about 28,000. This is an estimate based on official statistics regarding both public and private sector data controllers in the EU and taking further assumptions into account such assuming that US companies obliged to comply with the GDPR would also require a data protection officer, and of those companies who self-certified under Safe Harbor are likely included in that number.

Parliament finally approves of GDPR

15. April 2016

The European Union will have a new data protection regulation. After four years of ups and downs, the European Parliament came to an agreement on thursday in a plenary vote of support for the GDPR and the companion Data Protection Directive for policing and the judiciary.

The German MEP Jan Philipp Albrecht commented that “the General Data Protection Regulation makes a high, uniform level of data protection throughout the EU a reality,” and added that, “the regulation will also create clarity for businesses by establishing a single law across the EU. The new law creates confidence, legal certainty, and fairer competition.”

In order to give businesses and organizations time to adjust their compliance and data protection issues, the new GDPR will officially become effective in two years. The GDPR includes provisions such as the impositions of a clear and affirmative consent for processing personal data and a clear privacy notice. Further, there will be obligations concerning the breach of notification and the implementation of potential fines up to 4 percent of a company’s global annual turnover.

European Commission First Vice-President Frans Timmermans, Vice-President of the Digital Single Market Andrus Ansip, and Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality Vera Jourova welcomed the new regulation as it will “help stimulate the Digital Single Market in the EU by fostering trust in online services by consumers and legal certainty for businesses based on clear and uniform rules.” They went on commenting the Data Protection Directive for police and the judiciary, saying that it “ensures a high level of data protection while improving cooperation in the fight against terrorism and other serious crime across Europe.”

Therefore, in order to build public awareness of the reforms “the EU will launch public awareness-raising campaigns about the new data protection rules” Albrecht and Jourova, along with MEP Marju Lauristin commented and added that “the European Commission will work closely with member states, the national data protection authorities, and stakeholders to ensure the rules will be applied uniformly across the EU.”

European Council accelerates the process for adopting the GDPR

7. April 2016

The Council of the European Union announced that the process for adopting the GDPR will be accelerated. This is due to the the fact that the General Secretariat of the Council sent a Note requesting the Permanent Representatives Committee to use the so called “written procedure” in order to adopt the Council’s position. Initially a vote on the Council’s position was planned on 21st April 2016, when the next Justice and Home Affairs Council takes place. However, the Council has decided to accelerate the process for adoption by using the “written procedure”. Proceding this way is an exemption as it does not include public deliberation.

The mentioned Note states that the “need to send the Council’s position at first reading to the European Parliament during its April I plenary, will only be possible to adopt the Council’s position at first reading within this very short deadline via the written procedure, which would be launched on Thursday 7th April 2016 and would end on Friday 8th April 2016, at midday. Delegations’ attention is drawn to the exceptionally short duration of this written procedure.”

When looking on the next steps it is to say that once the Council’s position is adopted,  it will then be sent to the European Parliament. The European Parliament will go on by acknowledging the receipt during the next plenary session taking place on 11-13 April 2016. Afterwards, the Parliament’s Civil Liberties Committee will vote on a recommendation to Parliament regarding the Council’s position. These recommendation will then be used as a foundation for the Parliament’s adoption of the GDPR in one of the following plenary meetings.

Ten relevant practical consequences of the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation

22. January 2016

After several negotiations, the European Parliament, the European Council and the European Commission finally reached a consensus in December 2015 on the final version of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which is expected to be approved by the European Parliament in April 2016. The consolidated text of the GDPR involves the following practical consequences:

1) Age of data subject´s consent: although a specific, freely-given, informed and unambiguous consent was also required according to the Data Protection Directive (95/46 EC), the GDPR determines that the minimum age for providing a legal consent for the processing of personal data is 16 years. Nevertheless, each EU Member State can determine a different age to provide consent for the processing of personal data, which should not be below 13 years (Arts. 7 and 8 GDPR).

2) Appointment of a Data Protection Officer (DPO): the appointment of a DPO will be mandatory for public authorities and for data controllers whose main activity involves a regular monitoring of data subjects on a large scale or the processing of sensitive personal data (religion, health matters, origin, race, etc.). The DPO should have expert knowledge in data protection in order to ensure compliance, to be able to give advice and to cooperate with the DPA. In a group of subsidiaries, it will be possible to appoint a single DPO, if he/she is accessible from each establishment (Art. 35 ff. GDPR).

3) Cross-border data transfers: personal data transfers outside the EU may only take place if a Commission decision is in place, if the third country ensures an adequate level of protection and guarantees regarding the protection of personal data (for example by signing Standard Contractual Clauses) or if binding corporate rules have been approved by the respective Data Protection Authority (Art. 41 ff. GDPR).

4) Data security: the data controller should recognize any existing risks regarding the processing of personal data and implement adequate technical and organizational security measures accordingly (Art. 23 GDPR). The GDPR imposes strict standards related to data security and the responsibility of both data controller and data processor. Security measures should be implemented according to the state of the art and the costs involved (Art. 30 GDPR). Some examples of security measures are pseudonymization and encryption, confidentiality, data access and data availability, data integrity, etc.

5) Notification of personal data breaches: data breaches are defined and regulated for the first time in the GDPR (Arts. 31 and 32). If a data breach occurs, data controllers are obliged notify the breach to the corresponding Data Protection Authority within 72 hours after having become aware of it. In some cases, an additional notification to the affected data subjects may be mandatory, for example if sensitive data is involved.

6) One-stop-shop: if a company has several establishments across the EU, the competent Data Protection Authority, will be the one where the controller or processor’s main establishment is located. If an issue affects only to a certain establishment, the competent DPA, is the one where this establishment is located.

7) Risk-based approach: several compliance obligations are only applicable to data processing activities that involve a risk for data subjects.

8) The role of the Data Protection Authorities (DPA): the role of the DPA will be enforced. They will be empowered to impose fines for incompliances. Also, the cooperation between the DPA of the different Member States will be reinforced.

9) Right to be forgotten: after the sentence of the ECJ from May 2014, the right to be forgotten has been consolidated in Art. 17 of the GDPR. The data subject has the right to request from the data controller the erasure of his/her personal data if certain requirements are fulfilled.

10) Data Protection Impact Assesment (PIA): this assessment should be conducted by the organization with support of the DPO. Such an assessment should belong to every organization’s strategy. A PIA should be carried out before starting any data processing operations (Art. 33 GDPR).

 

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