Tag: FBI

US court: Google must give foreign e-mails to FBI

9. February 2017

Lately, Google has lost a court case (in Philadelphia) on e-mail data storage on foreign server, so that, according to the judgement, from now on the data should be sent to the US FBI security service.

The Court diverges from the existing case-law since, in a recent case, Microsoft has successfully denied the publication of data stored on servers in the European Union, and referred to the legal requirements in the EU.
As a reason for Google’s publishing obligation, the judge argued that Google is constantly copying data between its data centers, so that it should be only needed a further transfer of the data requested by the FBI to the US, in order for the FBI to access it. Although this could be a violation of the rights of the user, this violation would take place in the USA and because of that again covered by the law. According to the court, the data transfer therefore does not represent any access to foreign data anyway.

Following the proclamation of the judgment, Google has already commented on the procedure and announced to appeal against the decision, and continue to oppose to all official demands that go too far. Google has also explained that data is distributed on the servers around the world for technical reasons and in some cases it is not at all clear where the data is being stored. The verdict shows that each year Google receives from the US investigators somewhat 25,000 information requests.

Category: EU-U.S. Privacy Shield · USA
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FBI statistic: 87% of the needed data could be accessed in 2016

15. November 2016

Motherboard online just published numbers that were disclosed by the FBI concerning whether the FBI is able to unlock most devices they need to get into.

According to General Counsel Jim Baker the FBI is able to unlock or/and access data stored on both smartphones and computers. This statement is supported by the numbers that were released.

In 2016 the FBI

  • has encountered passwords or passcodes in 2,095 out of 6,814 – 31%,
  • with regard to the 2,095 devices that were locked, the investigators were able to get access in 1,210 cases and
  • couldn’t unlock around 880 devices.
  • In conclusion, in the vast majority of cases, namely 87%, the FBI was able to access the data that was needed.

Concidering that the FBI and Apple fought in court earlier this year regarding the FBI’s request to help breaking into the iPhone of an alleged terrorist who killed 14 people in a shooting and that this case led to a battle on encryption in which the FBI argued that encryption, which cannot be broken, supports criminal investigations rather than making them harder due to the fact that access to the data can sometimes lead to important evidence on a suspect or on a victim’s phone or computer.

However, the mentioned numbers, that have so far never been published, “demonstrate that even with encryption turned on by default on all newer iPhones and some Android phones, it is posing a problem in a relatively small number of cases – while that same encryption is presumably preventing a wide range of crimes”, according to Kevin Bankston, the director of the New America.


FBI paid probably more than 1 Million for cracking San Bernardino iPhone

26. April 2016

NBC News reports that FBI Director James Comey might have disclosed how much the agency spent for cracking the iPhone of the San Bernardino attackers.

Comey commented on the case so that the organization paid “a lot, more than I will make in the remainder of this job, which is seven years and four months, for sure” at a security conference in London. He went on that it “was in my view worth it” and that the FBI will now be able to crack any other iPhone 5s with IOS 9 by using the developed software.

Based on this given timeframe and by multiplying his salary of $180,000 per year, NBC News comes to a figure of $1.3 million. However, there was no official comment on part of the FBI.

Category: USA
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